Be a part of a creative and interactive community of talents! Build your connections, find resources, and extend your brand! Explore your opportunities!

News

  • Mar 21, 2017A Look Inside Disney’s Massively Lucrative Remake Factory

    Photo-Illustration: Maya Robinson Back in 2007, Tim Burton made  a splashy homecoming . The director had spent the early part of his career working on short films for Disney and animating on now-forgotten projects like  The Fox and the Hound ; now he was returning to the studio to develop a pair of ambitious remakes, one of his short film  Frankenweenie  and the other a live-action remake of the animated  Alice in Wonderland . The reason that Disney had been so keen to lure the director back had mostly to do with product. In the years since...
  • Mar 21, 2017Robert Silvers, a Founding Editor of New York Review of Books, Dies at 87

    Robert B. Silvers in his office at The New York Review of Books in 2012.   Credit Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times Robert B. Silvers, a founder of The New York Review of Books, which under his editorship became one of the premier intellectual journals in the United States, a showcase for extended, thoughtful essays on literature and politics by eminent writers, died on Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 87. Rea S. Hederman, the publisher of The Review, confirmed the death. The New York Review, founded in 1963, was born with a mission — to raise...
  • Mar 21, 2017Comic-Con Museum to Open in Balboa Park

    A 1930s baseball bat, 1950s tennis racquet and 1980s skateboard — all totems of San Diego’s rich sporting history — are being swapped out for comics, movie props and souvenirs of today’s pop culture in a major shift at Balboa Park. The San Diego Hall of Champions, a park institution since 1961, is going out of business and San Diego Comic-Con International is taking its place in a deal blessed by the city Wednesday and announced Thursday. The sports museum, a creation of the late Bob Breitbard, builder of the San Diego Sports Arena and inveterate...
  • Mar 15, 2017As Immigration Rules Tighten And Federal Funding For The Arts Disappears, What Happens To Classical Music In The US?

    The anti-immigrant phobias surging through Europe and North America have so far had little practical effect on classical music organizations, although there are notable exceptions — one of Britain’s most beloved orchestras, The European Union Baroque Orchestra, is presenting its last U.K. concert on May 19 and will then move to Antwerp.  The orchestras’ general manager, Emma Wilkinson, said recently, in the context of post-Brexit Europe: “I do worry that European orchestras will not be inviting talented British musicians to work with them. It will just...
  • Mar 15, 2017Misha Mengelberg, 81, Pioneering Pianist Of Europe’s Jazz Boom

    Misha Mengelberg performing in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, in 1996. Photograph: Frans Schellekens/Redferns In his last years the Dutch pianist, composer and improviser Misha Mengelberg, who has died aged 81, would sometimes whistle and sing in conversation with visiting friends when advancing Alzheimer’s disease made words particularly elusive. But conversing this way was perhaps not as big an inconvenience for Mengelberg as it might have been for some, since much of the music he had initiated and participated in for more than 50 years resembled a spontaneous conversation in...
  • Mar 15, 2017Dance Or Die: He Faced Down Death Threats From ISIS And His Father Rather Than Give Up Ballet

    Jean-Pierre Frohlich and Ekaterina Krysanova, a principal dancer for the Bolshoi Ballet. Credit Damir Yusupov for Bolshoi Theatre In 1951, “The Cage” shocked the world. Prickly and intense, this  Jerome Robbins  ballet concerns a female-dominated world where acts of violence are everyday occurrences. A Novice is born into an insect tribe, led by a Queen. Instinctively, the Novice knows what to do when a male intruder enters: She crushes his neck between her knees. She falls in love with a second intruder, but in the end, kills him, too. Her backup is a...
  • Mar 7, 2017For The Country Music Industry, The Subject Of Donald Trump Is Kryptonite

    The man’s face  is shrouded by shadows, but the silhouette is unmistakable: comb-over hairdo, thick neck, beefy red power tie. Two fists, bronzed and engorged like mylar balloons, pump skyward from a podium in a pugilistic dominance display. The reign of the 45th US president, as depicted in a  music video released late last month  by the outsider country artist Sturgill Simpson, is short-lived. It ends in an act of left-wing wish-fulfillment, with a boy in a cape destroying both the podium and a massive, barbed border wall, allowing a procession of...
  • Mar 7, 2017How The Hirshhorn Spent Two Years Preparing For The Yayoi Kusama Show

    The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden spent two years preparing to give visitors about 20 seconds of wow. “ Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors ” invites visitors to consider their place in the universe by immersing themselves in the Japanese artist’s whimsical and ethereal installations. The ephemeral nature of the exhibition’s mirror rooms — the enclosures that seem simultaneously cosmological and kitschy — belies the painstakingly detailed work required to host it. From constructing the conceptual artworks to controlling the...
  • Mar 7, 2017The Flapbooks Of 16th-Century Venice (They Were Oh-So- Naughty)

    Imagine you were a rich European in the 16th century, and you wanted to travel. Top on your bucket list might be Venice, a cosmopolitan, free-wheeling city, known for its diversity, romance, and relaxed mores. Venice was a wealthy place, where Titian, Tintoretto, and other famous artists were  at the height of their powers . As a republican port city, it was tolerant of all sorts of people and all sorts of behavior in ways that other European cities were not. While in Venice, you might purchase a flap book to help you remember the good times you had there. Above...
  • Feb 27, 2017The UK, Waterstones Opens ‘Unbranded’ Small Bookstores To Some Backlash

     The Waterstones store in Southwold is located in a grade II-listed building, and has a sign written in plain lettering above the front door. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo The managing director of book retailer  Waterstones  has defended the company’s decision to open three unbranded stores, saying it will be good for “customers, town centres and... staff.” Waterstones has recently opened three stores under different names, sparking accusations that they are posing as independent bookshops to avoid the backlash against the homogenisation of...
  • Feb 27, 2017A Shoving Match, Possibly Involving A Neo-Nazi, Broke Out At The Minneapolis Institute Of Art This Weekend

    Exterior view of the 24th Street entrance to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. A shoving match broke out in a most unlikely place, the typically serene Minneapolis Institute of Art, where three people who appeared to be neo-Nazis fought with several others in another group of activists, a witness said Sunday. Security guards arrived at the mayhem Saturday afternoon on the museum's third floor, broke up the confrontation and had one of the reputed neo-Nazis on the floor, said museum visitor Will Bildsten. A friend of Bildsten's said he saw punches thrown during the...
  • Feb 27, 2017There Was A Time When ‘Casablanca’ Was An Object Of Art-House Worship, But That Time Is (Finally?) Ending

    Photo illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo. Photo by Thinkstock. Still by Warner Bros. In 1957, the Brattle Theater on Harvard Square kicked off its Humphrey Bogart series with the 1942 classic  Casablanca.  Bogart himself had just died, and the response to the film was rapturous. By the fourth or fifth screening, “the audience began to chant the lines,” the theater’s then-manager told Noah Isenberg, author of  We ’ ll Always Have  Casablanca:  The Life, Legend and Afterlife of Hollywood ’ s Most Beloved Movie .  It...
  • Feb 22, 2017What Will DC’s Shakespeare Theatre Do Without Founder Michael Kahn?

    Michael Kahn, longtime artistic director of Shakespeare Theatre Company, will leave that position after the 2018-2019 season. (Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post) On any given night, in the houses that Michael Kahn built, you could find yourself transported to Illyria or Bohemia, to Dunsinane or Athens. Next to you might be seated a justice of the Supreme Court or an accountant from Gaithersburg or an English teacher from Manassas — all slaking their classical thirsts. Up on the stages of his Shakespeare Theatre Company, you were apt to encounter actors, nationally known...
  • Feb 22, 2017New Music Is Booming In L.A. – And There’s One Problem With That

    It was succinctly called “Noon to Midnight.” On Oct. 1, 2016, for 12 continuous hours, a succession of wide-ranging contemporary music concerts ebbed, flowed, and overlapped throughout Walt Disney Concert Hall: its auditorium, its lobbies, its stairways, its gardens, and eventually out onto the street. Presented by the Los Angeles Philharmonic, as part of its Green Umbrella series, this marathon of musical performances and multistage logistics attracted an enormous — and in many cases younger — audience. Many stayed for the entire 12 hours....
  • Feb 22, 2017Met Museum Director Makes The Case For The NEA In New York Times Op-Ed

    Thomas Colligan Four years ago, in a small warehouse in central  China , a team of Chinese archaeologists showed me objects that they had unearthed from a nearby ancient tomb. Laid out on a folding table was an exquisite array of vases, ritual vessels and a set of heart-stoppingly beautiful silver gilt tigers and dragons that fit in the palm of my hand, perhaps part of a long-forgotten regal board game. These finds were a keyhole through which we could glimpse the sophistication of the Han dynasty rulers, who, 2,000 years ago, conquered and united the enormous region that...
  • Feb 14, 2017New York City Ballet’s Sara Mearns Learns How To Play A Villainess

    Ms. Mearns donning makeup for her role as the Fairy Carabosse.   Credit Natalie Keyssar for The New York Times Fairies can be so fickle. One night, all you want to do is break a spell. The next, with ice in your veins and a malicious flourish, you put a curse into action. On Thursday,  Sara Mearns , the glamorous New York City Ballet principal, made an unlikely debut: the evil  Fairy Carabosse  in “ The Sleeping Beauty .” Her usual role, which she performed Wednesday, is the Lilac Fairy, Princess Aurora’s shimmering protector who...
  • Feb 14, 2017London Mayor Announces Plan For Massive Creative Hub In Thames Estuary

    How part of the development could look under the plans  Rory Gardiner The 40-mile stretch of water, from  Canary Wharf  to Southend in Essex and Thanet in Kent, is the subject of a  government development project to create tens of thousands of new jobs and homes by 2050.  Among the new proposals are  theatre-making studios in Bexley, an arts centre in Woolwich, a foundry for large sculptures and artworks in Silvertown including the UK’s biggest 3D  printing  centre, a gaming hub at the University of Essex, and industrial...
  • Feb 14, 2017America’s (And Maybe The World’s) Oldest Working Conductor

    Ed Simons, 100, the conductor and violinist, plays at his longtime home in Rockland County, N.Y. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times When strangers express amazement that he is 100 years old, the orchestra conductor Ed Simons likes to extend his longevity by saying his love for music “started before I was born,” spurred by his father playing Mozart symphonies on a Victrola. “I could hear the music in my mom’s belly,” said Mr. Simons, who lives in Pomona, N.Y., in Rockland County. “They told me when I was a kid that I would...
  • Feb 7, 2017After Three-Year Search, Vancouver Symphony Finds Its Next Music Director

    Otto Tausk, who will take over the music directorship of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in 2018, at the Orpheum Theatre on Thursday. Task has been music director of Switzerland’s Symphony Orchestra and Opera Theatre St. Gallen since 2012. The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra announced that Dutch conductor  Otto Tausk  will be its next music director, beginning July 1, 2018 — just in time for the orchestra’s centennial season. Tausk will take over the helm from  Bramwell Tovey , 63, who has served as VSO music director since...
  • Feb 7, 2017Small Liberal Arts College Gets $100 Million Worth Of Art For Its Museum

    Colby College's $15 million Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion, left, opened in 2013, making the Colby College Museum of Art the largest museum in Maine.  Staff file photo by Gordon Chibroski WATERVILLE — The Colby College Museum of Art has received a gift of more than $100 million from longtime supporters Peter and Paula Lunder that college officials say will help cement the region’s reputation as a world-class arts destination. The donation, the Lunders’ second gift of more than $100 million, includes about 1,500 works of art and will launch the Lunder...
  • Feb 7, 2017Developer Plans An Arts Center In An Old Renault Factory In The Middle Of The Seine

    Architectural rendering of the new S17 & S18 art hub proposed for the Île Seguin in Paris (© Baumschlager Eberle Architectes et RCR arquitectes) The property developer Emerige group plans to build an extensive art centre and 13,000 sq. m art hotel on Île Seguin, an island in the western suburbs of Paris that once housed the Renault car factory. The new development, called S17 & S18, will transform the former industrial site into “one of the biggest cultural hubs in Europe”, says a spokeswoman for the Emerige. The S17 centre will show...
  • Jan 31, 2017As Top-Tier Artists Age, the Art World Hopes to Cash In

    A Sotheby’s employee looking at Gerhard Richter’s “Blau” in London in 2014. Credit Andrew Cowie/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Chuck Close and other artists used to sit around bars like the Cedar Tavern and Max’s Kansas City and talk about art. “I have more conversations today over what we’re going to do to protect our spouses, our children, our work,” Mr. Close said. At 77, Mr. Close is among a critical mass of prominent — and profitable — artists in their twilight years (including Claes Oldenburg, 88;...
  • Jan 31, 2017The Arts-Are-Good-For-The-Economy Arguments Have Failed – They’ve Even Helped Kill The NEA, Argues Arts Exec

    (Credit: shutterstock/Getty/Mireia Triguero Roura) I spent more than a decade working for an organization that defended the National Endowment for the Arts. Every year, like clockwork, some Republican would magically balance the federal budget by gutting two agencies (the NEA and the National Endowment for the Humanities, or NEH) that account for one one-hundredth of one percent (.0001) of federal spending. For reference’s sake, our government spends roughly as much on paper clips and copy paper as it does on all of the nation’s theaters, museums and libraries...
  • Jan 31, 2017India’s Biggest Book Festival Warily Makes Room For The Hindu Radicals It Used To Conider Pariahs

    Writers, journalists and publishers at the Penguin Random House India party on the sidelines of the recent Jaipur Literature Festival.   Credit Poras Chaudhary for The New York Times JAIPUR, India — Every year at this time, India’s beau monde rearranges itself in Jaipur for a spectacularly popular five-day literary festival. There are Punjabi princesses in Jackie Onassis sunglasses, book club aunties in top-shelf homespun, parboiled-looking Englishmen, men of letters with Oxbridge accents and the occasional well-buffed South Delhi influence peddler. At...
  • Jan 23, 2017One Thing That’s Key To The Writing Life

    I began reading Louise Glück’s poems around the time I handed in the final draft of my first book. Now I can see that the book was a culmination of a decade of work and obsession, but at the time, without the manuscript to anchor my thoughts, I felt adrift. I had to come down from the high of achieving what I had set out to do and had to face the blank page again. For a year, I plunged into another project, until I realized that I was rewriting my first book and that I did not yet have the depth and experience to give the new story the justice it deserved. For another...
  • Jan 23, 2017All Of The Training That Goes Into Learning The Lion Dance For Lunar New Year

    Brandon Lee, 15, practiced with a lion head during a rehearsal for the Chinese Freemason Athletic Club dance troupe in Lower Manhattan.   Credit An Rong Xu for The New York Times The first thing you notice in the stairwell to the fourth-floor studio on Canal Street in Manhattan is the measured thumping coming from behind a metal door. Just beyond the entrance, large papier-mâché lion masks were twisting and turning to the drumbeat. On a recent Friday evening, the teenagers made their way across the studio floor — sagging from decades of jumps and...
  • Jan 23, 2017The Ultra Popular BroadwayCon Is In A Dispute With Actors’ Equity

    Theater fans at BroadwayCon in 2016.   Credit Caitlin Ochs for The New York Times Last January, the first BroadwayCon brought  thousands of theater fans  to New York despite a massive snowstorm. But one week before the convention’s  expanded second iteration , organizers have hit a snag: a labor dispute with the Actors’ Equity Association, who has asked its members not to perform, or even rehearse, for the event until an agreement is reached. In a note sent to Actors’ Equity members on Friday, Flora Stamatiades, the union’s...
  • Jan 17, 2017After 146 Years Ringling Brothers Circus To Fold Its Tents

    Feld Entertainment CEO Kenneth Feld (Tim Pannell for Forbes) Ringling Bros. circus announced Saturday that it would be closing down permanently in May 2017 after 146 years. Kenneth Feld, a billionaire whose family has owned the circus since 1967, blamed falling ticket sales after the retirement of Ringling Bros. iconic elephants following a bruising 14-year legal battle with animal rights activists. “Ringling Bros. ticket sales have been declining, but following the transition of the elephants off the road, we saw an even more dramatic drop,” Kenneth Feld...
  • Jan 17, 2017Dance Classes For The Blind At The Royal Ballet

    Increased confidence. Better range of motion. Improved balance. A sense of freedom. Most dancers, including those who are blind or partially sighted, would say that ballet training teaches all of these. Though dance is a highly visual art form, there’s no denying the kinesthetic reward of moving the body. That’s exactly why these students attend the Monday Moves classes, designed especially for people with visual impairment, in London. The participants range from young adults to senior citizens and have varying degrees of sight, but they...
  • Jan 17, 2017Hoard Of Gold Coins Found Inside Antique Broadwood Piano

    A gold hoard was found in a piano in Shropshire A mysterious hoard of gold coins has been discovered hidden in a piano in Shropshire and a local coroner now needs to determine whether it is “treasure”. The British Museum, which administers the Portable Antiquities Scheme, describes the find as “substantial”.  The gold was recently discovered by a tuner inside a Broadwood upright piano which had originally been sold in 1906 by a musical instruments shop in Saffron Walden, Essex. The ownership of the piano for most of the 20th century remains untraced,...
  • Jan 12, 2017Detroit Symphony Settles On New Contract Eight Months Early

    The positive tenor of relations between the  Detroit Symphony Orchestra  and its musicians continued as the musicians ratified a new contract more than eight months before the current contract expires. It's the second consecutive, three-year agreement negotiated well in advance of the expiration date, a notable accomplishment in the wake of the acrimonious 2010 contract negotiations that spurred the musicians' strike that year. The DSO and orchestra negotiating committee, representing 87 musicians, reached the tentative agreement for the new contract in...
  • Jan 12, 2017Pop Culture Has Become A Multi-room Echo Chamber With Little Broad Impact

    When “One Day at a Time” started its run on CBS in December 1975, it became an instant hit and remained so for almost a decade. In its first year, “One Day at a Time,” a sitcom about working-class families produced by the TV impresario Norman Lear, regularly attracted 17 million viewers every week, according to Nielsen. Mr. Lear’s other comedies were even bigger hits: One out of every three households with a television watched “All in the Family,” for instance. Last week, a new version of “One Day at a Time” started...
  • Jan 12, 2017What a Russian Dancer Really Thinks About Performing in the U.S.

    Growing up in Moscow, the American dance world was my American dream. I was a competitive ballroom-turned-jazz dancer, and I wanted nothing more than to perform jazz dance at its place of origin: the United States. But in Russia, we had certain stereotypes and misconceptions about the way the dance world works in the U.S. Since moving here and joining cast of the national tour of  Pippin , I’ve realized the reality of dancing here doesn’t always match up with my expectations.   Expectation : The American dance community is super competitive...
  • Dec 29, 2016I Taught Myself Piano In A Prison Cell, Using A Cardboard Box

    Every time I got a new cellmate, I warned him, “Don’t be alarmed. I have a cardboard piano that I play.” ILLUSTRATION BY ELEANOR TAYLOR In February, Jennifer Lackey, a philosophy professor at Northwestern University, where I teach journalism, invited me to speak to a class she teaches at the Stateville Correctional Center, a maximum-security prison an hour outside of Chicago. Her students, fifteen men, are all serving long sentences, mostly for violent crimes. Some will be at Stateville until they die. I talked with the students about storytelling, and had them...
  • Dec 29, 2016Rereading ‘Great Expectations’ After 50 Years

    Charles Dickens photographed circa 1860. PHOTOGRAPH BY JOHN & CHARLES WATKINS / HULTON ARCHIVE / GETTY FIfty years was long enough, I suppose, to put off reading Charles Dickens again. I had read him, and loved him, in college—“Hard Times” and “Bleak House” and “Our Mutual Friend” were the most admired texts in the nineteen-sixties; and then, on my own, soon after college, I read “David Copperfield” and “Martin Chuzzlewit,” with its hilarious impressions of the newspaper-and-spittoon dominated America of the...
  • Dec 29, 2016Could Wood – Glued-Together Layered Slabs Of It – Become The Next High-Tech Building Material?

    Trätoppen, a proposed building in Stockholm. Photo: Courtesy of Anders Berensson Architects Until recently, there were two basic ways of using wood in construction: chop down whole tree trunks for heavy beams or saw them into two-by-fours. The first, which produced log cabins and medieval church roofs, is costly and inefficient today, relying on scarce old-growth. The second gives us stick-built houses but nothing much taller than a few floors. Now a third technique, sandwiching layers of wood and adhesive, yields cross-laminated timber (CLT), a kind of super-plywood that...
  • Dec 22, 2016The OA’s Choreographer on the Meaning of the ‘Movements’

    Ryan Heffington Very mild  spoilers for  The OA  below. While the new Netflix series  The OA  is ostensibly science fiction, it’s filled with artistic choices that defy the conventions of the genre. None of those choices are more surprising than the Movements, a dance sequence that's crucial to the show's narrative. Over the course of eight episodes, Prairie (a.k.a. The OA) and her compatriots learn that this supernaturally potent quintet of hand and body motions can potentially heal the sick, raise the dead, and even allow...
  • Dec 22, 2016In 1912, Thousands of Women Rallied Against 'Useless' Christmas Giving

    Eleanor Robson Belmont  BAIN   The year was 1912, and the rampant commercialism of Christmas in America had begun to irritate the working women of New York City.  Americans had been exchanging holiday gifts for centuries, after  the ritual became legal  in 1680 following a ban by the Pilgrims, who considered it a crass anathema. By the 19th century Christmas gifts were a firmly entrenched tradition. But by 1911, when a few dozen women in New York City formed what would later be called The Society for the Prevention of Useless...
  • Dec 22, 2016Scientists are trying to uncover what makes Stradivarius violins special – but are they wasting their time?

    Stradivarius violins  are renowned  for their supposedly superior sound when compared to other instruments. This has resulted in numerous studies hunting for a scientific reason for why Strads sound so good. A number of these studies have focused on the chemical composition of the wood in violins made in Cremona by Antonio Stradivari in the 17th and 18th centuries. Others have considered the violins made by Stradivari’s contemporary, Joseph Guarneri del Gesu, whose violins are widely considered to be  just as good . Research often looks at how the...
  • Dec 13, 2016New York Times Kills Its ‘Inside Art’ Column

    On Friday, the New York  Times   debuted  a new column in its arts pages, Show Us Your Wall, which will consist of interviews with collectors from a variety of fields where they open up about how they install their art collection at home. But more notably, the  Times  also retired its Inside Art column, which had been a mainstay of the culture section for over two decades, a must-read for art-market participants and prognosticators every Friday (or, when it began getting posted online, Thursday evening). “Back in the Stone...
  • Dec 13, 2016Whoa, Did Mozart Really Outsell Beyoncé This Year?

    The music business as we know it is  dead . It’s fitting that the final nail in its coffin would be Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart—the 18th-century composer, long-dead himself—who this month became 2016’s top artist by CD sales. Mozart owes the win to a boxed set of his music that was released Oct. 28 in celebration of the 225th anniversary of his death and went on to sell 1.25 million CDs in just five weeks. (Drake’s  Views  took twice that time to edge past 1 million sales, by comparison.) The compilation “is the fruit of years of...
  • Dec 13, 2016First Look At A Massive New Project For LA’s Arts District

    Another high-design megaproject is being pitched for the Arts District, this time right alongside the Los Angeles River. The Gallo family, longtime owner of the Rancho Cold Storage facility on Mesquit Street, has teamed with rising-star Danish architect Bjarke Ingels and real estate firm V.E. Equities to propose a sizable new development consisting of two connected buildings, 30 stories tall at their highest point. The project, called 670 Mesquit, would hold approximately 800,000 square feet of office space, 250 rental apartments and two boutique hotels as well...
  • Dec 6, 2016I Went to My First Classical Music Concert. It Was in My Living Room.

    The smile that spread across my face a few seconds after the Zaffre Quartet began the rousing finale of Mozart’s String Quartet in G was the first hint that I’d stumbled onto something special. A few minutes later, as I glanced around my living room, my friends’ toe-tapping and head-nodding confirmed I wasn’t the only one enjoying the music. I barely listen to classical music, so how did a live string quartet end up in my apartment on a Saturday night? As I scrolled through my Twitter feed last month, a tweet about Groupmuse caught my attention....
  • Dec 6, 2016How The Music World Flocked To Instagram In 2016

    Many social media networks have tried and failed to become the go-to platform for musicians to engage with their fans. Remember Twitter #Music or Facebook Mentions? Are any musicians using Snapchat other than DJ Khaled? But while others have fallen short in capturing the music world, Instagram has taken a series of small steps to turn its once photo-driven service into a creative haven where artists tease new music, reveal album artwork, announce tour dates, and offer intimate behind-the-scenes glimpses. To cite just a few of those steps, over the past year, the platform has...
  • Dec 6, 2016A TAP DANCER LIKE NO OTHER

    The new big deal in tap is Michelle Dorrance, whose troupe, Dorrance Dance, has just completed a run at the Joyce. Dorrance, who is thirty-seven, is a girl from North Carolina whose backstory might have been written by a press agent. Her mother, M’Liss Gary Dorrance, a ballet dancer (she performed in Eliot Feld’s first company), founded and directed the Ballet School of Chapel Hill. Her father, Anson Dorrance, currently the women’s soccer coach at the University of North Carolina, led the U.S. women’s soccer team to the World Cup in 1991. Put those two...
  • Nov 22, 2016The Founding Novelist Of Israeli Literature (Even Israelis Have Trouble Reading Him)

    Agnon examined traditional Jewish life through a twentieth-century lens. ILLUSTRATION BY RICCARDO VECCHIO It has been half a century since Shmuel Yosef Agnon won the Nobel Prize in Literature. Yet he is one of those laureates for whom the prize has not translated into universal fame. Like Claude Simon (France) or Camilo José Cela (Spain), Agnon remains largely the possession of his original audience. In his case, however, defining that original audience is a difficult matter. Agnon wrote in Hebrew—he is the only Hebrew writer to win the Nobel—and he...
  • Nov 22, 2016William Penn Foundation giving $100 million to remake city parks, libraries, and rec centers

    AP PHOTO/MATT ROURKE Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney greets the William Penn Foundation's Janet Haas during a news conference back in March. The foundation has awarded the city up to $100 million towards Kenney’s plan to remake the city’s parks, libraries and rec centers.     by  Tricia L. Nadolny , Staff Writer Mayor Kenney's bold initiative to revitalize the city's parks, libraries, and recreation centers as a way to fight poverty and strengthen neighborhoods is receiving a major lift - up to $100 million from...
  • Nov 22, 2016Hokusai’s Picture Book of Everyday Life in Edo-Era Japan

    Katsushika Hokusai, from  Drawings for a Three-Volume Picture Book  (c.1823–33) (all photos © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston unless otherwise noted)   Katsushika Hokusai was a prolific draftsman. Although most famous for his landscapes in his woodblock print series  Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji , he drew just about everything, from scenes of everyday life to the supernatural. He even published his own  modern designs for combs and pipes , filling two entire volumes with 150 illustrations of solely the former. Printed in 1823, that title...
  • Nov 15, 2016Technology Invites a Deep Dive Into Art

    ByEilene Zimmerman   For many years, patrons were asked to turn off their cellphones when they entered a museum. Now, they’re encouraged to use them with technologies like augmented and virtual reality, touch-screen tables and customized audio tours. The goal is to enhance the visitor’s experience while keeping the artwork front and center. Here are some examples. Dreams of Dalí This virtual reality experience drops the viewer into Dalí’s 1935 painting “ Archaeological Reminiscence of Millet’s ‘Angelus,’ ”...
  • Nov 15, 2016My Friend Leonard Cohen: Darkness and Praise

    By   LEON WIESELTIER NOV. 14, 2016 “Dear Uncle Leonard,” the email from the boy began. “Did anything inspire you to create ‘Hallelujah’”? Later that same winter day the reply arrived: “I wanted to stand with those who clearly see G-d’s holy broken world for what it is, and still find the courage or the heart to praise it. You don’t always get what you want. You’re not always up for the challenge. But in this case — it was given to me. For which I am deeply grateful.” The question came from my son, who was...
  • Nov 15, 2016A Campaign to Restore and Release Early American Films Directed by Women

    Kino Lorber is crowdfunding an effort to rerelease more than a dozen movies made in the US by female directors between 1910 and 1929. The late actress Dorothy Davenport launched her career early, making a name for herself at Universal Studios by the age of 17. She later turned to directing and producing films — although her name often appears in the credits as Mrs. Wallace Reid, even in the years after her husband passed away. At least one of those films,   The Red Kimono , is now set for rerelease under her given name, nearly 100 years after its...
  • Oct 25, 2016Still the one: Phillips to offer fresh-to-market Clyfford Still canvas

    by   SARAH P. HANSON Phillips has revealed a highlight of its forthcoming 20th-century and contemporary art sale in New York on 16 November: a seldom seen, never before auctioned canvas by Clyfford Still. Estimated to make between $12m-$18m, the untitled painting from 1948-49 was acquired from the artist by the painter Edward Dugmore, his student at the California School of Fine Arts, and also passed through the hands of the Texas collector Edward Kitchen, before entering an East Coast collection about 20 years ago.   Clyfford Still, Untitled...
  • Oct 24, 20169 ART EVENTS TO ATTEND IN NEW YORK CITY THIS WEEK

    BY  The Editors of ARTnews TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 Opening: “Kerry James Marshall: Mastry” at Met Breuer This mid-career survey, one of the most hotly anticipated New York museum shows of the year, focuses on the work of Kerry James Marshall, the Chicagoan painter whose paintings and drawings, for the past 35 years, have focused on the position of black artists in art history. Marshall’s subdued, slightly melancholy, slightly hopeful canvases are often allegories—they rethink various art-historical genres, such as history paintings and...
  • Oct 24, 2016PIONEER WORKS ANNOUNCES FIRST ALTERNATIVE ART SCHOOL FAIR

    BY  John Chiaverina   Today, Pioneer Works announced the first Alternative Art School Fair, set to take place between November 18-20 at the organization’s Red Hook headquarters. The fair is a fairly comprehensive survey of over 50 experimental schools from 11 countries, and it’s completely free. In a release, Pioneer Works noted that participating schools “operate with a wide range of methodologies, missions, and theoretical approaches, that see the artist as a defining figure in the development of new methodologies for hybridized disciplines.”...
  • Sep 30, 2016The Matthew Bourne Dancer Killed In A Collision Last Year? The Driver Was Talking On His Cell Phone

    Posted:   September 29, 2016   4:30 am “Dancer Jonathan Ollivier was killed when his motorbike was hit by a minicab while the driver was making a hands-free call on his mobile, a court has heard. Ollivier died last August after   his motorbike collided with a car as he was making his way to the final performance   of Matthew Bourne’s   The Car Man .”
  • Sep 30, 2016Sex: the play that put Mae West in prison returns to New York

    A theatre group has teased out the proudly feminist subtext in West’s play, which was banned for obscenity but launched the actor into superstardom   Mae West in Night After Night: always in control of her own image. Photograph: Irving Lippman/Getty Images   This month, Sex returns to the city: an infamous play written by and starring the budding starlet Mae West in the 1920s. After a 10-month run on Broadway in 1927, the play was deemed by a grand jury to be such “obscene, indecent, immoral, and impure drama” that it might corrupt...
  • Sep 30, 2016Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra musicians on strike, reject pay cut demand

    All performances scheduled for this weekend have been cancelled  11:12 AM EDT Sep 30, 2016 PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (PSO) musicians are on strike after unanimously rejecting calls for a 15-percent pay cuts, pension changes and staffing cuts they say are proposed by management.  Musicians from American Federation of Musicians, Local 60-471 are actively protesting in front of Heinz Hall in downtown Pittsburgh. As a result of this strike, all performances scheduled to occur this weekend, including the John Williams event, have been cancelled...
  • Sep 9, 2016I’m A Deaf Actor, And I Don’t Want It To Define The Roles I Play

    Posted: Sep. 09, 2016 12:00 pm Genevieve Barr: “It’s an incredibly limiting way to live and to work. And because I have a disability that I cannot hide (or fully disguise), that means I stay firmly in the bracket of ‘deaf actor’, rather than ‘actor’. In the rigidity of the casting process, that can mean fewer than 10 auditions per year. … I can lip-read and hear with the use of hearing aids. Not as clearly as you, mind, but unlike you, I can crank up the volume. If my back is turned and you’re talking to me, I am probably not...
  • Sep 9, 2016Charlotte Moorman, Tradition Disrupter, Is the Focus of Two Shows

    “Think Crazy” is sound advice for today’s artists, faced with cookie cutter training and art fair sclerosis. And the phrase did once have some practical application. It was emblazoned, like a logo, across a banner at one of the New York Avant Garde Festivals that took place annually in the city between 1963 and 1980, rounding up feral fringe talent from around the world and letting it loose in places like Grand Central Terminal, Shea Stadium and the Staten Island Ferry. By fringe, I mean people who worked with esoteric art media (air, bullets, spaghetti) and had...
  • Aug 24, 2016Literary Fiction Helps Us ‘Read’ Others

    Stories featuring complex characters enhance our ability to decipher subtle verbal cues that communicate emotions. By Tom Jacobs Reading   Sense and Sensibility   increases one’s sensitivity. That’s the implication of   new research , which reports people who regularly enjoy literary fiction are better able to identify the emotional state of another when presented with a minimal visual cue. “Habitual engagement with others’ minds — even fictional ones” can bolster the sort of awareness that is...
  • Aug 24, 2016When the International Ballet Festival Leaps Into Miami, Pedro Pablo Peña Will Be Primo

    BY   CATHERINE ANNIE HOLLINGSWORTH   At the Miami Hispanic Cultural Arts Center, a grand white house standing just west of  downtown, Pedro Pablo Peña is organizing this year's   International Ballet Festival of Miami . Now in its 21st year, it's one of only a handful of festivals like it in the world. What began with only three or four companies has grown into a two-week event featuring performers from Latin America, Central America, Europe, Asia, and all corners of the United States. Like the Olympics, this event showcases the best of...
  • Aug 24, 2016How ‘Seinfeld’ Heralded Today’s Obsessive, Neurotic, and Inescapable TV Culture

    Television   |   By   Lara Zarum   |   August 17, 2016 Some TV shows blur the line between fiction and reality so acutely it’s hard to know where one stops and the other begins. In many ways,   Seinfeld   is the apex of this phenomenon, which Jennifer Keishin Armstrong documents in her   new book   Seinfeldia: How a Show About Nothing Changed Everything . The author got an object lesson in her own argument last month when Kenny Kramer —  Seinfeld   co-creator Larry David’s former neighbor and the...
  • Aug 11, 2016When Women Were Barred From The Ancient Olympic Games, They Created Their Own

    By   Lauren Young AUGUST 10, 2016 Much   like their modern counterpart , the Olympic Games in ancient Greece wasn't exactly a level playing field for women. It's true that women of all ages were allowed to enjoy the festivities and exhilarating athletic events in cities throughout the Peloponnese states, including Delos and Athens. But the Games in Olympia in the land of Elis—the city where the Olympics originated—retained its traditional, sacred ban of women. Elis decreed that if a married woman (unmarried women could watch) was caught present...
  • Aug 11, 2016Is Seattle Art Fair the New Art Basel?

    By   Liz Suman  August 10, 2016   When you hear the phrase “art scene,” Seattle’s likely not the first city that comes to mind. Tech, coffee, rain, Kurt Cobain, sure. But art? Not so much—at least, not until now. Art Basel has been the majority shareholder in the U.S. art fair scene since the stateside satellite of the Swiss fair made its debut on the sticky streets of South Beach in 2002. But like most things that start off small and cool (Coachella, Facebook, the Lower East Side), the annual December event in Miami has progressively...
  • Jul 25, 2016The Fastest-Growing Format in Publishing: Audiobooks

    By JENNIFER MALONEY   The digital revolution that flummoxed the music, movie and publishing industries has given rise to a surprising winner: the audiobook.   Audiobooks are the fastest-growing format in the book business today. Sales in the U.S. and Canada jumped 21% in 2015 from the previous year, according to the Audio Publishers Association. The format fits neatly in the sweet spot of changing technology and changing behavior. Carrying around a pocket-size entertainment center stuffed with games, news, music, videos and books has conditioned people to seek...
  • Jul 25, 2016For Times Square Characters, a New Reality

    By   RALPH GARDNER JR.   It has been about a month since the city started corralling Times Square’s self-assertive Elmos, Spider-Men and desnudas into “designated activity zones.”   So how’s it working out? “All my friends is no good in this area,” said a costumed Mickey Mouse. He was referring to several other Mickey and Minnie Mouses nearby, as well as a large bird with an orange beak and black buttons I had trouble recognizing from Saturday mornings. “They harass us. No like.”   That was the...
  • Jul 12, 2016What It’s Like To Get Naked And Turn Blue For Spencer Tunick

    Posted: Jul. 12, 2016 6:00 am   “I was silently bombarding myself with questions: ‘Did I remember to shave my armpits?’, ‘Will people notice the freckle on my bum?’ and the big one: ‘What if I’m dyed   Avatar blue forever?’ As it happens, my fears were totally unfounded; it was the best and most surreal morning of my life.”     S tanding naked in the centre of   Hull   in the small hours of the morning is not something I ever expected to be doing. But that’s where I found...
  • Jul 12, 2016World’s Largest Orchestra, With More Than 7,500 Players, Performs In Germany

      Posted: Jul. 12, 2016 6:15 am this is what it sounded like By Kyle Macdonald, 11th July 2016, 12:23 The world has its largest orchestra: here's the record-breaking symphonic cacophony from the Commerzbank Arena stadium in Frankfurt. image: http://assets2.classicfm.com/2016/28/worlds-biggest-orchestra-frankfurt-1468232735-article-0.png On Saturday,   7,548    musicians assembled in a Frankfurt sports stadium to smash the world record for largest musical ensemble. The mastermind of the event, trumpeter...
  • Jun 23, 2016MoMA Apologizes for Dropping a Film Critical of North Korea

    By   ROBERT S. BOYNTON   The Museum of Modern Art has acknowledged it wrongly canceled the New York debut of “Under the Sun,” a documentary about North Korea that has been criticized by that country and Russia.   A slyly subversive look at the reclusive state by the Russian filmmaker Vitaly Mansky, the film had been scheduled to be shown at the museum’s 2016 Doc Fortnight   festival   on Feb. 19-29. But an email exchange provided by the film’s German producer to The New York Times shows that a festival organizer, Sally...
  • Jun 23, 2016VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN ON THE HALLUCINATORY SPLENDOR OF THE INTERNET

    June 22, 2016  By  Andrew Keen Virginia Heffernan’s new book   Magic and Loss   isn’t shy about its significance. “Just as Susan Sontag did for photography and Marshall McLuhan did for television, Virginia Heffernan illuminates the logic, aesthetics and mysteries of the Internet,” its jacket claims. And the early reviews have been positive, the   New York Times , for example, describing it   as “an enjoyable snapshot” which “embraces the Internet as a work in progress.” So I emailed...
  • Jun 23, 2016‘Jesus’s wife’ papyrus likely fake, scholar says

    By   Lisa Wangsness A Harvard professor who rocked the musty world devoted to studying early Christianity when she presented a tiny swatch of papyrus that referred to Jesus as married now concedes the fragment is probably a fake. Karen L. King’s acknowledgment about the papyrus she’d named “The Gospel of Jesus’s Wife” came after the Atlantic magazine’s website   published an investigative article that delved into the background of the fragment’s owner , Walter Fritz, a Florida man. “It appears now that all the...
  • Jun 9, 2016The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It

    SAN FRANCISCO — Twenty-seven years ago, Tim Berners-Lee   created the World Wide Web   as a way for scientists to easily find information. It has since become the world’s most powerful medium for knowledge, communications and commerce — but that doesn’t mean Mr. Berners-Lee is happy with all of the consequences. “It controls what people see, creates mechanisms for how people interact,” he said of the modern day web. “It’s been great, but spying, blocking sites, repurposing people’s content, taking you to the wrong...
  • Jun 9, 2016Exhibition Spotlight: Mezcala Models at the Met

    Two Mezcala architectural models from the Vilcek Foundation collection are currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition   Design for Eternity: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas . Created by the native peoples of Guerrero, Mexico, between 100–800 AD, the small stone sculptures, ranging from 2 to 8 inches tall, depict what are believed to be religious temples. Their function is not known with certainty, but they are presumed to have been votive objects, left for or buried with the deceased. "Mezcala Four Column Temple...
  • Jun 9, 2016Set Text Size Small Set Text Size X-Large NEWS THE TALENT TATE TAPS ICA LONDON DIRECTOR GREGOR MUIR TO HEAD COLLECTION OF INTERNATIONAL ART

    Big news from London this morning: Tate announced that it has hired Gregor Muir, the director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts in the city, to be the new director of collection, international art. Muir takes the place of Frances Morris, who was named director of Tate Modern in January. Muir starts in his new role at the beginning of next year. Muir became head of ICA London in early 2011, when the institution was wracked by fiscal deficits. During his tenure, he has worked to strengthen its financial footing, and overseen shows of work by artists...
  • May 25, 2016Stanford Announces New Leader for Stanford Live and Bing Concert Hall

    Stanford has appointed Chris Lorway as the new executive director of Stanford Live  and  Bing Concert Hall , the university’s main cultural presenting organization and venue. The role is a key one on the Bay Area cultural scene: Stanford Live is one of the most well-respected university-based arts presenters in the United States, and the Bing Concert Hall, which opened in January 2013 and cost more than $110 million to build, is Silicon Valley’s most prominent classical music venue. Lorway comes to Stanford from his role...
  • May 25, 2016Why cities should stop building museums and focus on festivals

    Last year the Institute of Museum and Library Services offered a catchy statistic:  the United States has more museums than all the Starbucks and McDonald’s combined . It’s easy to understand why cities will leap at the opportunity to invest in new structures: “Starchitect”-designed buildings, from the Santiago Calatrava-designed Milwaukee Art Museum to Brooklyn’s undulating Barclays Center, could add an iconic image to the cityscape and garner positive media buzz. However, such massive public investments in permanent structures (what...
  • May 25, 2016Ohio Orchestra To Fold After 75 Years

    MIDDLETOWN — Middletown Symphony Orchestra’s 75th anniversary next year will also mark its grand finale. Steve Ifcic, the symphony’s board chairman, said the board “has unanimously made the decision to close the curtain on the orchestra and end our musical programs in May of 2017 at the end of the 2016/2017 concert season.” “Although a decision of this nature never comes easily, the fact is that there are many choices and much competition for an individual’s time and financial resources today, and we certainly took that into...
  • May 18, 2016Ambassador Theater Group Announces Leadership Change

    Howard Panter , a knighted titan of British theater who had been ambitiously leading his company into the American market, is suddenly out as leader of the company that he and his wife founded 24 years ago. The company, Ambassador Theater Group, which is the largest owner of theaters in Britain, portrayed the move as amicable, as did Mr. Panter and his wife, Rosemary Squire. But some in the theater industry in both cities suggested that the move was the predictable outgrowth of the  2013 acquisition of A.T.G. , as the company is known, by an American asset...
  • May 18, 2016THE SCOOP | COC Responds To Accusations Of Vendetta Against National Post Music Critic

    The Canadian Opera Company has responded to  accusations  that they sought to silence longtime classical music critic Arthur Kaptainis from the National Post, by releasing email correspondence between COC Media Relations Manager Jennifer Pugsley, and National Post’s new arts editor, Dustin Parkes. The emails show a friendly relationship between Parkes and the COC, with Pugsly offering him free tickets to shows, and requests for meetings to discuss story opportunities. “We make it a point to have meetings with editors to talk about what’s...
  • May 18, 2016Crystal Pite Choreographs A Meltdown

    “Y ou’re not stretching your face enough”, explains  Crystal Pite , patiently. She demonstrates with a lop-sided grimace that distorts her rather beautiful, open features into a kind of agitated question mark. It’s not the standard rehearsal note from a choreographer to their dancers, but the eight men and women in the studio mimic Pite’s expression as they dance, and an unsettling new energy comes into their bodies. You can feel a shift in the atmosphere of the room. It’s this close attention to detail, this hunting down of the...
  • May 13, 2016In France and Japan, Trains Now Bring the Art to You

    Japan’s major passenger railway company JR East has just launched what officials call “the world’s fastest art experience” with a traveling art gallery aboard one of its bullet trains, or  shinkansen.  Zipping at speeds up to 200 miles per hour, a train named “ Genbi Shinkansen ” on the Jōetsu Shinkansen line now holds a group exhibition of contemporary works by six Japanese artists, the Japanese collective Paramodel, and New York-based artist  Brian Alfred . Individual carriages of the train, which runs through the Niigata...
  • May 13, 2016An Icon of Midcentury Organic Modern Architecture Is Destroyed

    A spiraling 1955 house that was considered one of the icons of 20th-century organic modernism has been destroyed. And not just demolished but ripped out of the ground, as  Bruce Goff’s   Bavinger House  in Norman, Oklahoma, had been built right into the state’s red earth. Its corkscrew shape, constructed over several years with artists Nancy and Eugene Bavinger and local University of Oklahoma (OU) students, contained floors lofted on cables above a stone ground embedded with a creek. The whole...
  • May 13, 2016Scrap artistic directors, urges Red Room boss

    Topher Campbell has called on the UK theatre industry to scrap artistic directors, claiming new and emerging talent is not progressing in the sector under this model. Speaking at the opening of day two of Theatre 2016, the theatre director and filmmaker said his own work as artistic director of theatre company the Red Room had shown him that young people have a “great hunger for the death of institutions”. He added that having one person running a company or building artistically was “old-fashioned” and should be reconsidered. Campbell said...
  • May 6, 2016Why we love unfinished art

    Our fascination with canvases that have been abandoned or deliberately left ‘painterly’ should not blind us to the beauty of the finished work, says Philip Hensher The unfinished is, of course, something which tells us about the history of a work of art’s creation. A work of art may have been interrupted by the artist’s death, as with the paintings that Klimt left behind in his studio. Or it may simply have been abandoned when a patron failed to fulfil his obligations, or the painter had grown bored with the subject and moved on to something else. These...
  • May 6, 2016When Wellness Is a Dirty Word

    First came the anthropologist of Arctic poverty who found me on Instagram and confided that she was a Jazzercise fanatic. Then the intellectual historian who eloquently introduced herself as an expert on a similarly Serious Topic but rapidly and with sparkling eyes, before any of our fellow conferees entered the elevator, effused that it was really her Ashtanga yoga practice that sustained her. And the implacable administrator who waited for the meeting room to clear before explaining to me, her gaze softening, the admirable commitment of her Wednesday-night "Zumba ladies," who...
  • May 6, 2016NEWS YouTube CEO: TV’s Loss of Viewers Is Our Gain

    At Brandcast ad event, video giant boasts of bigger primetime reach in 18-49 demo than top 10 TV shows combined YouTube  keeps flexing its massive muscles in the face of the TV industry. The  Google -owned video powerhouse said it now reaches more viewers on mobile alone in the target demo of 18-49 than any single television network — and in primetime, YouTube delivers more of that audience than the top 10 TV shows combined. “At a time when TV is losing audiences, YouTube is growing in every region, on every...
  • Apr 27, 2016A Short History of Harriet Tubman in American Pop Culture

    Harriet Tubman will appear on the $20 bill, Treasury officials announced yesterday. That means she’ll appear over diner counters and in wallets alongside America’s white founding fathers. This marks the first time Tubman will get commemoration of this particular sort, but not the first time her image has driven and inspired Americans. Below, we’ve got a quick history of Harriet Tubman in American art and pop culture. The examples come from a fascinating paper  by women’s studies professor  Janell Hobson , published in 2014 in the journal...
  • Apr 27, 2016The 9th-Century Islamic “Instrument Which Plays by Itself”

    n 2009, Tokyo’s Waseda University built a  fedora-sporting flautist robot  powered by cranked air. But this is only the most recent attempt at a mechanical, flute-playing musician. In the 9th century, the  Banū Mūsā  brothers in Baghdad wrote a treatise describing their “instrument which plays by itself.” Their innovative machine is described in  Allah’s Automata: Artifacts of the Arabic-Islamic Renaissance (800-1200) ,   recently published by  Hatje Cantz . The book accompanies an  exhibition of...
  • Apr 27, 2016Meet The Women Behind Ecuador’s Award-Winning Prison Radio Show

    The anchor’s raspy voice  is distinctly Colombian. She pauses for a brief second and continues in Spanish. “In a world where bureaucracy keeps growing and there is an excess of information, we also run the risk that our voices drown. The great challenge is to find out a way to respect other people’s projects, in a critical way, allowing all voices to be heard. Otherwise we run the risk, like Maggie, where a specific group in society looks for more destructive ways to be heard.” The woman speaking, 34-year-old Diana Rojas, isn’t...
  • Apr 20, 2016How Shakespeare’s Work Changed (A Lot) After Elizabeth I Died

    M ost of us think of  Shakespeare  as an Elizabethan. It’s almost impossible not to. Try imagining  Shakespeare in Love  ending with a cameo appearance by Simon Russell Beale as  King James rather than with Judi Dench’s Queen Elizabeth. But Shakespeare was as much a Jacobean writer as he was an Elizabethan one, and to forget that is to distort the trajectory of his career and play down the quite different set of challenges he faced in the decade following the death of Elizabeth in 1603. With the accession of the King of Scots in that year,...
  • Apr 20, 2016Fewer Americans Are Visiting Local Libraries—and Technology Isn't to Blame

    A curious phenomenon is gripping public libraries in the United States. On the one hand, Americans still adore their libraries. According to a new Pew Research study, 76 percent of Americans say that libraries well serve the needs of their community. And since 78 percent of Americans say they’ve been to a local public library  ever,  it seems that nearly everyone who’s been to a local library at least once in their lives approves of them. Yet on the other hand, fewer and fewer Americans are using the institutions every year. In the 12 months before the most...
  • Apr 20, 2016James Franco Convinces Jerry Saltz He’s A Real Artist

    James Franco has famously resisted being identified as merely an actor, pursuing a simultaneous life in the art world — making videos of dollhouses split in half, painting fat pets, and restaging Cindy Sherman’s iconic 1977–1980 “ Untitled Film Stills ,” with Franco himself standing in for Sherman, who was (in her own version) standing in for a variety of actresses in B-movies.  New York  art critic  Jerry Saltz called the works  in that 2014 show at the Pace Gallery, Franco’s most high-profile in New York, “silly...
  • Apr 13, 2016'Lost Caravaggio' found in French attic causes rift in art world

    It could turn out to be an Italian Renaissance masterpiece by one of history’s greatest painters; yet the mysterious 400-year-old canvas was only found by accident when the owners of a house near Toulouse went to fix a leak in the ceiling. The large, remarkably well-preserved canvas of the beheading of the general Holofernes by Judith, from the apocryphal Book of Judith, was painted between 1600 and 1610, specialists estimate. And many experts believe it could be a work by the Milan-born master,  Caravaggio . Labelled the Caravaggio in the attic,  France...
  • Apr 13, 2016Barbra Streisand, Barry Levinson Reviving ‘Gypsy’ for STX Entertainment (EXCLUSIVE)

    Barbra Streisand  may realize her dreams of bringing Mama Rose to the big screen. STX Entertainment  is in advanced negotiations to make “Gypsy” with the Grammy and Oscar winner taking the lead role, and Oscar winner  Barry Levinson  (“Rain Man”) directing. Production on the film hit a snag last fall after Universal Pictures put the project into turnaround. It had been developing “Gypsy” for several years, stretching back to STX chairman Adam Fogelson’s days as the movie studio’s head....
  • Apr 13, 2016Romanian Ballet Company Loses Its Leading Lights

    Administrative tumult, a prominent snub on the Bucharest National Opera’s website and questions over artistic direction have cost the Romanian national ballet company its two biggest stars:  Johan Kobborg and  Alina Cojocaru . Mr. Kobborg resigned Tuesday as its artistic director and his fiancée, the dancer Ms. Cojocaru, said she would not dance under the current management. Their departures end a period in which the company’s global reputation began to rise under the leadership of Mr. Kobborg, a former principal dancer at the Royal Danish Ballet...
  • Apr 13, 2016Romanian Ballet Company Loses Its Leading Lights

    Administrative tumult, a prominent snub on the Bucharest National Opera’s website and questions over artistic direction have cost the Romanian national ballet company its two biggest stars:  Johan Kobborg and  Alina Cojocaru . Mr. Kobborg resigned Tuesday as its artistic director and his fiancée, the dancer Ms. Cojocaru, said she would not dance under the current management. Their departures end a period in which the company’s global reputation began to rise under the leadership of Mr. Kobborg, a former principal dancer at the Royal Danish Ballet...
  • Mar 23, 2016What Is a Robot, Really?

    The year is 2016. Robots have infiltrated the human world. We built them, one by one, and now they are all around us. Soon there will be many more of them, working alone and in swarms. One is no larger than a single grain of rice, while another is larger than a prairie barn. These machines can be angular, flat, tubby, spindly, bulbous, and gangly. Not all of them have faces. Not all of them have bodies. And yet they can do things once thought impossible for machine. They vacuum carpets, zip up winter coats, paint cars, organize warehouses, mix drinks, play beer pong, waltz...
  • Mar 23, 2016The World's Biggest Street Dance Competition

    Dancers from all over the world compete in the international tour of Juste Debout in the hope that they will get the chance to battle in the preliminary rounds in France and perform at the finals in Paris. This year, for the first time, the judges are all women who have previously won in the four main categories: popping, locking, hip-hop and house
  • Mar 23, 2016Are These The Ten Most Beautiful Ceilings On Earth?

    Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire Completed in 1334 by the royal carpenter William Hurley, the exquisite timber lantern over the central octagonal tower of Ely Cathedral is one of the greatest feats of medieval structural engineering and design. From the cathedral floor, the lantern appears like the centre of a great, eight-pointed star, with a carving of Christ in Glory at its centre. Constructed primarily from eight English oak trees, the 30ft-high lantern is supported by highly visible timber fan vaulting and by a hidden tent-like lattice of oak beams. Wooden panels –...
  • Mar 16, 2016New Skincare infomercial/commercial

    COMPANY Health Solutions Marketing Joanne Vanchieri   PRODUCTION DESCRIPTION A Marketing Company is looking for actors to be in their next commercial/infomercial. Do you find that your décolleté area and neck don’t look the way they used to? Well, you’re not alone. That’s why we have formulated a product to specifically address these issues. We are calling for actors with wrinkles to test and try our product, if selected they will be featured in our next commercial with pay and free product. We are also looking for a...