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  • Nov 8, 2017David Hallberg On His Struggle With Perfectionism

    Published in Dance Magazine on   " 11.07.17            David Hallberg 's   much-anticipated memoir ,   A Body of Work: Dancing to the Edge and Back ,   comes out today . The book offers insight not only into his journey back from a traumatic injury, but gives tantalizing glimpses into his backstage life and his partnerships with star ballerinas like Natalia Osipova. For   a sneak peek, here's an excerpt about his struggle with perfectionism, and the magic that he realized could happen once he...
  • Nov 8, 2017A Year After Bankruptcy, New York’s Big Apple Circus Is Back

    Published in New York Times on   " 11.07.17 With $8 million in debt, the beloved one-ring circus had seemed like it was finished for good, but - after an auction and a switch to for-profit status - it's back in its old digs at Lincoln Center. Alexis Soloski paid a visit. A year ago, the Big Apple shrank a little. Big Apple Circus, which opened in 1977, had amassed more than $8 million in debt and did not produce a fall show. A crowdfunding campaign sputtered, and the circus filed for   bankruptcy . But after a successful auction,   Big Apple...
  • Nov 8, 2017Smithsonian’s Air And Space Museum To Get Seven-Year Renovation

    Published in Smithsonian Magazine on   " 11.07.17   "Given its four decades of life and enduring heavy traffic, it comes as little surprise that the museum is now in need of major renovations. Acting on severe structural degradation as well as a desire to breathe fresh life into its air and space exhibitions, the Smithsonian has announced that a sweeping, seven-year upgrade will commence this coming summer. Happily, ... only half of the space will be inaccessible at any given moment." Read More:...
  • Oct 10, 201730 Publishers Reject Novel For Being ‘Too ***’ For Mass Market, So Crowdfunding Comes To Rescue

     ‘Don’t tell me there’s no one out there who wants to read about *** lives’ … Matt Cain in Victoria Square, Bolton. Photograph: Simon Taylor/Attitude A novel that was rejected more than 30 times by publishers for being “too ***” has been inundated with backing from names including David Walliams, Mark Gatiss and SJ Watson after its author turned to crowdfunding. Matt Cain’s  The Madonna of Bolton  tells the story of Charlie Matthews, who falls in love with Madonna on his ninth birthday. The obsession “sees...
  • Oct 10, 2017Can There Be A Weinstein Company Without Harvey Weinstein?

    Harvey Weinstein, who faces accusations of sexual harassment stretching back decades, is the driving force behind the Weinstein Company.   Credit Emily Berl for The New York Times LOS ANGELES — A bicoastal staff meeting of the Weinstein Company was hastily convened late Thursday. Staff members were scared and shaken after public complaints of sexual harassment against Harvey Weinstein, the entertainment company’s pugnacious co-founder. With the help of a video conferencing system, David Glasser, the Weinstein Company’s president and chief operating...
  • Oct 10, 2017Diller Scofidio + Renfro To Design London’s Long-Awaited Concert Hall

    Architect Elizabeth Diller says the venue will 'be sensitive to the inherited character of the Barbican and its vital role in Culture Mile' © Ungano + Agriodimas New York-based architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro have been chosen to design London’s new £250m concert hall. The architects were selected by the City of London Corporation from a shortlist of well-established names, including Frank Gehry and Renzo Piano, to design the new Centre for Music. The concert hall will be built on the current site of the Museum of London as a permanent home for Simon...
  • Sep 18, 2017 Civil rights anthem We Shall Overcome freed from copyright

    The first verse of the song, which has come to symbolize the spirit of protest, is no longer under copyright after a New York verdict The first verse of the civil rights anthem We Shall Overcome is no longer under copyright, a New York federal judge   ruled   on Friday. Described as the “most powerful song of the 20th century” by the Library of Congress, the   suit against   the existing copyright holders was brought last year by the same   legal team   who had successfully disputed longstanding ownership claims over Happy...
  • Sep 18, 2017Emmy winners 2017: the complete list

    All of the night’s big winners (and losers), all in one place by   Bryan Bishop @bcbishop     Sep 17, 2017, 8:21pm EDT   The 69th Emmy awards have come and gone, and the night ended up being a very big deal for streaming services — well, one streaming service in particular, at least. In total, online platforms like Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu racked up more than 120 Emmy nominations this year, with   Netflix’s   Stranger Things   coming in as one of the most-nominated shows of the year . (It earned 18 different...
  • Sep 18, 2017NEWS FotoFocus Symposium to Address Feminism and Politics in Photography This Fall

    BY   Andy Battaglia   POSTED   09/14/17 A one-day symposium organized by FotoFocus in Cincinnati will feature a slate of panels and presentations in the service of themes embedded in the title “Second Century: Photography, Feminism, Politics.” At Memorial Hall on October 7, a keynote conversation between the photographers Tabitha Soren and Katy Grannan will top a roster including curators, critics, journalists, and institutional figureheads. Writer Aruna D’Souza will present a talk titled “Photography in an...
  • Aug 25, 2017The Industries Whose Money Drives The Art Market In The 2010s

    Post to Faceboo By Anna Louie Sussman Aug 22nd 2017 Money makes the world go round, and the art world is no exception. But where that money comes from has evolved over the past 20 years. Artsy analyzed two sample cohorts of the world’s top collectors to see how the industry make-up behind the most elite collectors has changed over the last two decades. The big takeaways? Finance is in, really in. “Other”—a designation we used for lawyers, doctors, architects, and individuals who didn’t fit into the most highly represented...
  • Aug 25, 2017Music Big Band Contractor Sends Out Fat-Shaming Memo, Gets Pushback – And Promptly Shuts Down

      By   Jennifer Liu   on   August 24, 2017 On Tuesday, two singers   released a memo   from Sheraton Cadwell Group, a Toronto firm that contracts and manages big bands, that read in part, “As per our highly selective casting requirements … only singers who are physically fit and slim (or at the very least, those who know how to dress strategically/suitably in order to not bring attention to their temporary physical/dietary indulgences) would be showcased with our boutique orchestras.” On Wednesday, word of the memo hit the...
  • Aug 25, 2017New World Record For Dancing Robots

    “On a large plaza in the city last week, company staff diligently set up more than one thousand of the 18-inch robots to attempt the dancing record. You’ll be pleased to know that the team achieved the feat, with a total of 1,069 Dobi robots strutting their stuff in sync with one another, and as a consequence delighting the  Guinness World Record officials  who had traveled to Guangzhou to verify the effort.” Watch Video Here: https://youtu.be/ouZb_Yb6HPg
  • Aug 7, 2017If Amazon Is Going To Have A Drone Delivery Army, It’ll Need A Drone Repair Platoon As Well

    Amazon has long had ambitions for autonomous package delivery, but before drone  delivery can go into wider use , there’s some obstacles to overcome. Recently, the company has filed for numerous patents, from a  drone beehive placed in populated areas  to  dropping packages with parachutes  to a  massive airship .  Business Insider  spotted a new patent filing : one for a network of mobile workstations based on boats, tractor trailer trucks, trains, or other vehicles, which can be driven to areas of high demand. The idea presented...
  • Aug 7, 2017Google Has Figured Out How To Make Your Phone Photos Better Before You Take Them

    TAKING INSTAGRAM-WORTHY PHOTOS  is one thing, editing them is another. Most of us just upload a pic, tap a filter, tweak the saturation, and post. If you want to make a photo look good without the instant gratification of the Reyes filter, enlist a professional. Or a really smart algorithm. Researchers from MIT and Google recently showed off a  machine learning algorithm  capable of automatically retouching photos just like a professional photographer. Snap a photo and the neural network identifies exactly how to make it look better—increase contrast a...
  • Aug 7, 2017Ty Hardin, Who Carved A Niche Playing ‘Bronco,’ Has Died At 87

    Ty Hardin was best known for his role as the gunslinger Bronco Layne.   Credit Warner Bros. Ty Hardin , who roamed the West searching for adventure in the television series  “Bronco”  in the late 1950s and early ’60s, died on Thursday in Huntington Beach, Calif. He was 87. His wife, Caroline, confirmed his death, but said the cause had not been determined. In a television landscape crowded with gunslingers like Sugarfoot, Cheyenne, Lucas McCain (the Rifleman) and Bret Maverick, Mr. Hardin carved a niche playing Bronco Layne, a...
  • Aug 2, 2017Lost Play By ‘Peter Pan’ Author Turns Up In Texas

    J.M. Barrie, at work at his desk in an undated photograph. Getty Images It has been 80 years since J.M. Barrie died. It has been even longer since Peter Pan's creator penned  The Reconstruction of the Crime  with humorist E.V. Lucas — and yet in all this time, editor Andrew Gulli says the brief play the pair pulled together never glimpsed the stage or even the printed page. That changes this week, as Gulli's  The Strand Magazine  has finally published the typescript of the bedroom farce  long squirreled away  at the University of Texas' ...
  • Aug 2, 2017After Five Years, What’s Next for Crystal Bridges Museum?

    Aerial view of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. ADAIR CREATIVE/COURTESY CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS Founded by Walmart heiress Alice Walton, currently the wealthiest woman in the United States, the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opened its doors in 2011, but despite a commendable five-year record of accomplishment, it remains a perplexing outlier among the country’s well-endowed art museums—and not just because, like Walton, it grew up in Northwest Arkansas. During its run so far, leadership has pivoted around a minefield...
  • Aug 2, 2017Met Museum Turns Over A Second Ancient Artwork To Police

    The head of an ancient marble sculpture of a bull on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art is at the center of a legal case.   Credit William and Lynda Beierwaltes Manhattan prosecutors have taken custody of an ancient bull’s head that was on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art because of concerns that the antiquity was looted from a Lebanese storage area in the 1980s during Lebanon’s civil war. Met officials said that one of their curators raised concerns about the artifact after researching it last year, prompting the museum to alert Lebanese...
  • Jul 17, 2017For Syrian Actors, An Intensely Lengthy, Challenging Road To The United States

    Mohamad Alrefai in “While I Was Waiting.” The play, based on a true story, will be performed at Lincoln Center this week.   Credit Didier Nadeau BEIRUT, Lebanon — A group of Syrians has been invited to stage a play this week at  Lincoln Center  in New York. For the cast and crew, scattered across six countries, getting to the United States has been the real-life drama — in part maddening, in part farcical. The play’s lead actor, Mohamad Alrefai, showed up for his first interview at the United States Embassy in Beirut eager...
  • Jul 17, 2017Confronting The Past Through Pop-Up Refugee Art

    Latif Mukasa, center, an artist and refugee from Uganda, giving a tour of the Temporary Museum in Amsterdam, a pop-up exhibition showcasing the experience of migrants. Mr. Mukasa and a visitor sit on a metal bed taken from an asylum-seeker’s bedroom, part of “The Maquette of Dreams” by Mounira Al Solh. Credit Ilvy Njiokiktjien for The New York Times AMSTERDAM — In 2010, Latif Mukasa, an artist and *** rights activist from Uganda, was forced into hiding after his name and photograph were printed in a newspaper’s list of “Uganda’s 100 Top...
  • Jul 17, 2017The Next Big Thing In Books: James Comey

    James B. Comey has been meeting with editors and publishers in New York. His book is expected to go to auction this week.   Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times James B. Comey, the former  F.B.I.  director who was  fired  in May by President Trump, is writing a book about his experience in public service, including his tumultuous and brief tenure in the Trump administration. Mr. Comey has been meeting with editors and publishers in New York in recent days, and is being represented by Keith Urbahn and Matt Latimer, partners at the literary agency...
  • Jul 13, 2017Artist Creates Yet More Paints That Only Anish Kapoor Is Forbidden To Use

    Image courtesy Stuart Semple / CultureHustle.com The “final blow” in the Anish Kapoor-Stuart Semple color war is two psychedelic, crystalline paints that can’t be purchased by Kapoor. The  "color war" between British artists Stuart Semple and Anish Kapoor  has entered a new, rainbow-hued round of conflict. It all started back when Kapoor got exclusive rights to use  Vantablack paint, the blackest of blacks , and wouldn't share it with other artists. Semple retorted by making  the pinkest pink, which anyone could buy  except Kapoor...
  • Jul 13, 2017Changing Young People’s Minds About Classical Concerts Will Not Be Easy

    Music in the Round, Sheffield, UK. Image Credit: Independent Sheffield (http://independent-sheffield.co.uk/music-in-the-round/) It’s been a much debated subject for years now, but what are the barriers that seem to be preventing, or disinclining, young people from going to classical music concerts? Even a casual glance across the rows of seating at a typical symphony concert will yield the truth of the matter. Children and young adults are conspicuous by their absence, and this is despite the strenuous efforts of the creative and marketing teams behind our orchestras to...
  • Jul 13, 2017British Student Arrested Under Terrorism Laws For Owning ‘The Anarchist Cookbook’

    It was a quiet night until the bombs began crashing out of the sky. Only a few minutes earlier, on the roof of a gray, single-story building not far from the city of Manbij in northern Syria, Josh Walker had been peacefully sleeping. Now the walls were collapsing beneath him, he was surrounded by fire, and his friends were dead. Walker, a 26-year-old university student from Wales in the United Kingdom, was in Syria volunteering with the People’s Protection Units, or YPG, a Kurdish-led militia that has been a leading force in the ground battle against the Islamic...
  • Jul 6, 2017U.S. Authorities Are Delaying And Denying More Visas To Visiting Artists (And Giving More Ulcers To Presenters)

    German group Boreas Quartett Bremen. (Courtesy Alasdair Jardine) Immigration lawyers believe the State Department has been denying more artist visas after President Trump ordered heightened vetting for all visa applications earlier this year. In a March 6  memo , released after Trump issued his  second executive order  on immigration, the president directed "immediate implementation of additional heightened screening and vetting protocols and procedures for issuing visas." The memo, according to some prominent attorneys who specialize in artist travel,...
  • Jul 6, 2017Kelan Phil Cohran, 90, Chicago Jazz Composer, Bandleader, Teacher, Macher

    Kelan Phil Cohran is seen playing his harp on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015, in an exhibit at the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago celebrating the 50th anniversary of the foundation of the AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians).  (Terrence Antonio James / Chicago Tribune) Chaka Khan and Earth, Wind & Fire's Maurice White studied with him. The globally influential Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) was co-founded by him. And generations of musicians drew inspiration from the pioneering work of...
  • Jul 6, 2017Revisiting The First Great Art Heist Of The New Millennium

    As the clock struck midnight on January 1, 2000, crowds around the world went wild. It was not only a new year, worthy of all the celebration that entails, but also a new millennium, one that many believed would start in  'Y2K' disaster . But the crisis was averted, the clocks and computers rolled back to zero with nary a hiccup, and the revelry began in full force in towns like Oxford, England.   While many had been preparing for the evening by stocking up on canned goods and bottled water (just in case), one person in the U.K. had a different idea of...
  • Jun 27, 2017Luxury-Brand Mogul To Build Art Museum In Paris’s Old Stock Exchange

    The interior of the Bourse de commerce, which the Pinault Foundation – with architect Tadao Ando – will transform into a contemporary art museum in Paris. Photograph: Charles Platiau/Reuters It is the latest chapter in the  art-world rivalry  of two of France’s richest businessmen: a saga of momentous contemporary art collections and a quest by their owners to build Paris museums that would transform the city’s landscape. When the French luxury goods tycoon  François Pinault  – once described as the most powerful man in...
  • Jun 27, 2017Pro Theater Workers In U.S. Still Disproportionately White And Male, Says Actors’ Equity Study

    A line at the TKTS box office in Times Square, run by the Theater Development Fund. Credit Mark Abramson for The New York Times Women and minority actors and stage managers are getting fewer jobs and often wind up in lower-paying shows than white male theater artists, according to a new study by  Actors’ Equity . The study, released as the union is increasing its focus on diversity issues, is based on an examination of employment data for shows that opened between 2013 and 2015. It comes amid a flurry of efforts to quantify a concern that has been expressed...
  • Jun 27, 2017Why Is Yo-Yo Ma Devoting So Much Time To Outreach In Chicago?

    Cellist Yo-Yo Ma with members of the Civic Orchestra of Chicago at the Concert for Peace at St. Sabina Church. Why does the celebrated cellist devote his time and talent to making our city a better place? For Ma, it’s not about the music —— or any art, really. "It’s about people." He bounds onto the stage with the grace of an athlete and the verve of a motivational speaker. The audience stands, cheering, before the first note sounds. Even if they've never heard him play, they've heard of Yo-Yo Ma. The legendary cellist is headlining the Concert for...
  • Jun 20, 2017John Avildsen, 81, Director Of ‘Rocky’ And ‘The Karate Kid’

    Sylvester Stallone in the first Rocky film, with Al Silvani (left) and Burgess Meredith as his cornermen. Initially sceptical about the script, Avildsen shot the film in 28 days for $1m. Photograph: Everett Collection/Rex The director John Avildsen, who has died aged 81, enjoyed his greatest success with two hit movies about sporting underdogs. Rocky (1976) launched the career of its writer,  Sylvester Stallone , who also starred as the down-at-heel Rocky Balboa, an amateur boxer with an unlikely shot at the world heavyweight title. Avildsen, who was initially sceptical...
  • Jun 20, 2017The Kennedy Center May Honor JFK, But It’s LBJ’s View Of The Arts That Prevailed

    Rendering of the new Kennedy Center expansion. (Courtesy Kennedy Center) To passionate arts lovers, the words of John F. Kennedy sound like Holy Writ. “I look forward to an America which will reward achievement in the arts as we reward achievement in business or statecraft,” reads one of the 35th president’s ringing exhortations, prominently chiseled on the walls overlooking the Kennedy Center terrace. Nearby is another: “This country cannot afford to be materially rich and spiritually poor.” When the Kennedy Center expansion project opens to the...
  • Jun 20, 2017Forger Arrested For Selling Fake Damien Hirst Prints – For The Third Time

    Damien Hirst in 2012 standing in front of one of his paintings at the Gagosian Gallery in New York. Photograph: Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images Three men were charged in New York on Monday with making counterfeit  Damien Hirst  prints which they sold on for more than $400,000. The fake “limited-edition” Hirst prints were sold online to dozens of art buyers around the world, according to Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance. The group included a man who had been released from prison only 15 days earlier for a similar scheme. “The art...
  • Jun 13, 2017How Howard Shalwitz Led DC’s Woolly Mammoth Theatre From Madcap Hole-In-The-Wall To New Play Powerhouse

    Founding Artistic Director of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company Howard Shalwitz. (Keith Lane/For The Washington Post) Washington theater is a city of niches, and few brands are as indelible as Woolly Mammoth’s. A “Woolly play” is new, big, wild. The acting is hyper-real. The design might blow up. The whole thing can soar or splat. Howard Shalwitz laid down those markers when he created Woolly in 1980 with actor Roger Brady and manager Linda Reinisch. With a nutty-sounding play called “The Kramer” — a sinister office comedy that might be...
  • Jun 13, 2017Actress Glenne Headly Dead At 62

    Glenne Headly in 1997.   Credit via Photofest Glenne Headly, whose acting career took shape at the renowned Steppenwolf Theater Company in Chicago and found its biggest audience in Hollywood with films like “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” and “Dick Tracy,” died on Thursday in Santa Monica, Calif. She was 62. The cause was complications of a pulmonary embolism, her husband, Byron McCulloch, said. Ms. Headly moved easily from comedy to drama and from stage to screen. Not often cast in lead roles, she played her parts with a subtle, scene-stealing...
  • Jun 13, 2017National Museum Of American Jewish History Lays Off Nearly One-Quarter Of Its Staff

    (ED HILLE / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER) -  The National Museum of American Jewish History officially opened to the public Nov. 14, 2010 with a dedication ceremony on Independence Mall and a visit by Vice President Joe Biden. After running a string of annual deficits, the  National Museum of American Jewish History  has embarked on a major retrenchment, including layoffs, museum officials said this week. The institution, which opened a $150 million building on Independence Mall in 2010, laid off 12 staff members outright on Friday. Other positions, now empty, will...
  • Jun 5, 2017The Benefits Of Being An Older Ballerina (Yes, Even Into Their 40s)

    Greta Hodgkinson (L), Sonia Rodriguez (C) and Xiao Nan Yu (R), and pose for a picture at a studio inside the Walter Carsen Centre at the National Ballet of Canada, in Toronto, Friday May 26, 2017. It might be one of Toronto’s most idiosyncratic spots, the stretch of road where the crumbling artery into the city’s downtown core runs alongside the National Ballet of Canada headquarters. In a window overlooking the Gardiner Expressway, the company’s three most senior ballerinas are quick with suggestions on how to pose. Time for a Globe and Mail photo shoot is...
  • Jun 5, 2017Banksy offers Bristol electorate free print if they vote against Tories

    Banksy’s Brexit mural, which appeared near the port of Dover in May. Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Graffiti artist  Banksy  has offered voters a free limited edition print if they vote for anyone other than the Conservatives this Thursday. The anonymous artist made the offer to voters in the Bristol North West,  Bristol West, North Somerset, Thornbury and Yate, Kingswood, and Filton and Bradley Stoke constituencies. Banksy posted the offer on his  website  on Saturday. “Simply send in a photo of your ballot paper from...
  • Jun 5, 2017Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Shoot Wraps After 17 Years and Multiple Setbacks

    After almost 20 years of pre-production, principal photography has wrapped on  Terry Gilliam ’s “The Man Who Killed  Don Quixote .” The shoot for the Don Quixote-inspired feature took place in Spain and Portugal. Gilliam teamed with Tony Grisoni on the screenplay, reuniting the pair who worked together on “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” among other titles. “ The Man Who Killed Don Quixote ” has been notoriously plagued by problems ranging from on-set disasters (including a flash flood) to production and funding issues....
  • Jun 1, 2017Report From Mongolia: What Has The Philadelphia Orchestra Gotten Itself Into?

    DAVID PATRICK STEARNS - Ulaanbaatar, capital of Mongolia ULAANBAATAR – Coming in for a landing at Genghis Khan Airport this week, a group of Philadelphia Orchestra musicians will be literally dropped into a parallel world where familiarity feels eerie and the exotic is oddly reassuring. The brown hills, dry heat, and brilliant blue skies here seem strangely like Southern California – except that a herdsman with a small group of cows is making his way up a steep incline near the airport. Outside the small but modern terminal, a half dozen presumably wild horses are...
  • Jun 1, 2017Noose Found Inside African American Museum in Washington

    The National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington. Credit Lexey Swall for The New York Times A noose was found Wednesday at an exhibition on segregation inside the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, the  Smithsonian Institution announced . Museum visitors found the noose on the floor in front of a display titled, “Democracy Abroad. Injustice at Home,” and it was reported to the United States Park Police. The permanent exhibition, “Defending Freedom, Defining Freedom: Era of Segregation...
  • Jun 1, 2017Controversial Walker Art Center Sculpture Will Be Dismantled And Burned

    Dakota leaders will oversee the dismantling of the controversial sculpture "Scaffold," beginning Friday. The gallows-like work then will be burned in a ceremony in the Fort Snelling area. Dakota tribal elders will oversee the dismantling of the controversial sculpture “Scaffold” beginning Friday, then hold a ceremonial burning of the wooden timbers of what once was envisioned as a cornerstone of the renovated Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. That plan, proposed by a Dakota committee, was  announced Wednesday  after a three-hour meeting with Walker Art Center...
  • May 23, 2017New York Gets Its First Museum Devoted To Contemporary Islamic Art

    An installation view of  Exhibition 1  at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Art (all photos © Charles Benton unless otherwise noted) “It was inspired by my favorite mosque in the world … the Faisal Mosque in Islamabad,” he said. “Have you been there?” I asked. “No, no, but I’m dying to go,” he responded. Standing in the bookstore of  the Institute of Arab and Islamic Art  on a bright day in Soho, this was how Sheikh Mohammed Rashid Al-Thani explained the angular logo for his recently established...
  • May 23, 2017Ringling Bros. Circus Wasn’t Just A Show, It Was A Major Logistical Feat

    A Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey's circus truck is unloaded as the "Out of this World" show is set up at the Royal Farms Arena in Baltimore. This was one of the last few stops on the circus's final tour. - Claire Harbage/NPR On the steps above the makeshift stables, the circus priest is getting nostalgic. "I did a baptism once in Fort Worth, Texas. ... I came in on an elephant carrying the baby, which was four weeks old," the Rev. Jerry Hogan says. "Now that baby is 15. I've married a lot of these kids and I've baptized their kids, and watched them grow." It's late...
  • May 23, 2017The Beatles’ ‘A Day In The Life’ – An Exegesis

    The Beatles during a recording session at EMI Studios, Abbey Road, London, in 1967. From Left: George Harrison, Paul McCartney, John Lennon, and Ringo Starr. It’s received wisdom that  Sgt. Pepper ’s Lonely Hearts Club Band , which arrived 50 years ago in the long record-breaking summer heat of 1967, is one of rock’s greatest albums. Inspired by Brian Wilson’s obsessive labor on the Beach Boys’ epic  Pet Sounds,  the  Sgt. Pepper  studio sessions were weeks of ideas tried, ideas rejected, and things tried anew....
  • May 16, 2017What Deborah Borda Told Curtis’s Graduating Class: Be ‘Soldiers For Music’

    Orchestra management veteran Deborah Borda, who takes over as president and CEO of the New York Philharmonic in the fall, gave the commencement speech Sat., May 15, 2017, at the Curtis Institute of Music. While the graduating scholars of Haverford College heard this year from author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Penn students from Sen. Cory Booker, the three dozen or so singers, pianists, violinists and other musicians taking degrees from the Curtis Institute of Music were implored by an industry leader to become “soldiers for music.” Deborah Borda, who leaves as...
  • May 16, 2017Enough With The Violence-Against-Women Scenes In Contemporary Ballet!

    Sterling Hyltin, thrown into the air by male dancers in a scene of violence on the opening night of “Odessa,” at New York City Ballet. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times When the curtain went down on Alexei Ratmansky’s dense, complicated new work for New York City Ballet last weekend, the end of a long Sunday matinee, my friend and I turned to each other, not sure what to think. “What was with the gang rape scene?” I said. My friend shook his head, as unenthused as I was. We both had been struck by it: a scene in which the...
  • May 16, 2017Using X-Rays To Find The Palimpsests Of A Young French Impressionist

    Senior conservator of paintings, Ann Hoenigswald is interviewed in front of X-ray images of works by Frederic Bazille at the National Gallery of Art. Hoenigswald has been investigating some paintings by Bazille. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post) While visitors to the National Gallery of Art’s new Impressionist exhibit see lush landscapes and intimate portraits, conservator Ann Hoenigswald spots clues involving an artist fixing mistakes and evidence of earlier compositions hidden underneath. Like a detective, the National Gallery’s senior conservator of paintings...
  • May 9, 2017Stradivarius Violins Lose Yet Another Blind Test To New Instruments

    Violinist Mira Wang plays the Ames Stradivarius violin. In 2012,  Claudia Fritz  from Sorbonne University packed a small concert hall near Paris with 55 volunteers from the violin world, including musicians, violin makers, music critics, composers, and more. From the stage, she asked seven internationally renowned soloists to play six violins. Three of these were new. The other three were Stradivarius violins, built by Italian craftsman Antonio Stradivari during the 17th and 18th centuries. Stradivari reportedly made around 1,100 violins and violas. Around half of...
  • May 9, 2017Man Slashes $3 Million Painting In Aspen Gallery

    One of two cuts made in the "Untitled 2004" painting by Christopher Wool. The quiet of Aspen's offseason was punctured this week by a $3 million crime as unusual as it was bizarre. An unknown man wearing sunglasses, a hat and a full beard on Tuesday afternoon entered a high-end art gallery near the base of Aspen Mountain, made a beeline for a wall-sized painting by artist Christopher Wool and slashed the canvas twice with a knife or razor blade before running out. "It's crazy," Gregory Lahmi, owner of the Opera Gallery on Dean Street, said Wednesday. "First of all, I'm...
  • May 9, 2017Midgette And Kennicott Dish The Met Opera 50th Anniversary Gala (And The House Itself, And The State Of Singing)

    The Metropolitan Opera Chorus in a scene from Barber's Antony and Cleopatra during the 50th Anniversary at Lincoln Center Gala. (Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera) NEW YORK —  On Sunday, the Metropolitan Opera, America’s leading opera house, celebrated the 50th anniversary of its home at Lincoln Center. Two Washington Post critics trade thoughts about the gala, opera, and the buildings that house it. Anne Midgette:  The Metropolitan Opera gala offered a cross-section of today’s opera world, from an opening aria by the venerable Plácido Domingo...
  • Apr 25, 2017That Ballerina Fired For Being Too Tall? She’s Headlining A New Ballet Company That’s Making Diversity Its Focus

    Pennsylvania Ballet principal dancer Sara Michelle Murawski will be dancing next season for the American National Ballet in Charleston, S.C. Sara Michelle Murawski, the ballerina fired from the Pennsylvania Ballet in December  because she was too tall , has been hired by a new company -- one that plans to highlight diversity. The American National Ballet will open its first season in the fall in Charleston, S.C., and Murawski was its first dancer announced. The Pennsylvania Ballet had notified her on the day after her final performance as the Sugar Plum Fairy that...
  • Apr 25, 2017The Art World Has Gone To War With Trump – But Will It Shoot Itself In The Foot?

    Courtesy of the artist and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York The protests started almost immediately after the presidential election. An artist named Annette Lemieux emailed the Whitney Museum and asked that her installation  Left Right Left Right  — a series of life-size photographs of raised fists turned into protest signs — be turned upside down. The artist Jonathan Horowitz and some friends started an   Instagram feed called  @dear_ivanka , attempting to directly appeal to the soon-to-be First Daughter and shame her into pushing her...
  • Apr 25, 2017A New Tool To Fight Art Forgery And Fraud: Online Bots Trolling The Dark Web

    Water Lilies by Claude Monet (1919). Copies of works by the French Impressionist are often passed off as genuine by criminals. Image: Metropolitan Museum of Art A new platform launching this month from Art Fraud Insights seeks to clean up the unregulated online art marketplace by hunting down fakes, forgeries and copyright infringement. The Art and Artistic Legacy Protection (AALP) service will work with artists and artist-endowed foundations to scour the darkest corners of the internet for bogus sale listings and unauthorised copies.  “There is a vast network of highly...
  • Apr 18, 2017Christine Goerke – How A Mozart Soprano Overcame A Vocal Crisis And Became Everyone’s New Favorite Brünnhilde

    Christine Goerke blowing a kiss to the crowd during a curtain call in February after her performance as Brünnhilde in “Götterdämmerung” at the Canadian Opera Company.   Credit Cole Burston for The New York Times TORONTO — She had just immolated herself onstage in one of the most demanding roles in opera: Brünnhilde, the Valkyrie who becomes mortal and redeems the world in Wagner’s epic “Ring” cycle. But as the soprano Christine Goerke basked in a standing ovation in February with the Canadian Opera Company here,...
  • Apr 18, 2017Michael Ballhaus, 81, Cinematographer For Scorsese And Fassbinder

    Michael Ballhaus, left, with the director Martin Scorsese on the set of The Departed, the 2006 Oscar winner. ‘It was Michael who really gave me back my sense of excitement in making movies,’ Scorsese said. Photograph: Allstar/Warner Bros The cinematographer Michael Ballhaus, who has died aged 81, helped to realise the work of two visionaries:  Rainer Werner Fassbinder , with whom he made 15 films, and  Martin Scorsese , for whom he shot seven, including the gruesome gangster drama  Goodfellas  (1990), which tested this exceedingly gentle man’s...
  • Apr 18, 2017Misty Copeland And Justin Peck Curate Ballet Series At Kennedy Center

    Misty Copeland (Bebeto Matthews) Since his career as a dance maker took off just five years ago, New York City Ballet resident choreographer Justin Peck has traveled the country creating works for companies large and small. Personally, professionally and artistically, he’s been deeply involved in ballet across America. Fittingly, having lived its moniker, Peck curated part of the “Ballet Across America” series at the Kennedy Center April 17 and April 19-23. “I’ve been exercising a different part of my brain,” Peck says with a laugh in a...
  • Apr 11, 2017Arkansas Lawmaker Tried To Ban Howard Zinn’s Books From Classrooms – And It Backfired

    Last week nearly 700 Arkansas teachers and school librarians received copies of books by Howard Zinn—thanks to a right-wing state representative. Well, not exactly. But here’s the story. Recently, Republican Kim Hendren, introduced legislation that would prohibit teachers in all public schools or state-supported charter schools from including any books in their curriculum by—or even "concerning"—the historian  Howard Zinn , author of the classic  A People’s History of the United States , who died in 2010. In response,...
  • Apr 11, 2017Stolen Normal Rockwell Painting, Now Worth $1 Million, Returned After 40 Years

    Stolen more than 40 years ago, a folksy painting of a slumbering child by American illustrator  Norman Rockwell   has been returned  to its rightful owners by the FBI. The unlikely recovery ends what the work’s original insurance company  has called  “one of the art world’s greatest mysteries for over four decades.” Though purchased in the 1950s for a nominal sum under $100—at a time when there was little to no demand or market for Rockwell’s original paintings—the current fair market value of the work...
  • Apr 11, 2017Last-Ever Round Of Annenberg Arts Fellowships Announced

    Careers in the fine arts can't be created with love or money. But the right combination of the two at the right time has boosted any number of recipients of the Leonore Annenberg Fellowship Fund for the Performing and Visual Arts, which has distributed $6 million to 70 artists over 10 years and which will formally announce its final round of grants Wednesday at the University of Pennsylvania.  Recipients have included ballet star Misty Copeland, Broadway's Bryce Pinkham,  Moonlight  actor Andre Holland, and numerous opera singers, including soprano Brenda Rae...
  • Apr 3, 2017Ikutaro Kakehashi, The Man Behind The Roland Drum Machine And Synthesizer, Has Died At 87

    The Roland TR-808 drum machine. Photograph: Publicity image Tributes have been paid to the man behind the synthesiser and drum machines that revolutionised electronic music in the 1980s and 90s, Ikutaro Kakehashi, who has died aged 87. The Japanese engineer founded the Roland Corporation in 1972 and invented a range of electronic drum machines and synthesisers used throughout popular music since the mid-1970s – by performers from Prince to New Order, Dr Dre to Kraftwerk. Kakehashi led Roland for four decades, and in his time developed one of music’s best-known...
  • Apr 3, 2017Hyperallergic’s April Fool’s Article Is Once Again The Best Thing Ever: Airbnb’ing The Met

    A view of one of the many listings by the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Airbnb (screenshot by the author) Today, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Airbnb launched a partnership that will allow visitors to rent out several of the institution’s historical rooms for a night at a time. The announcement comes after reports that the Upper East Side museum, which was the  second-most-visited  in the world last year and had a budget of roughly $300 million, is facing a budget shortfall of  $10 million . Now, as it looks to capitalize on its collection in...
  • Apr 3, 2017Secrecy And (Rather Salacious) Revelations At The Met

    Thomas P. Campbell, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, who resigned in February and will leave in June.   Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times In 2010, the Metropolitan Museum of Art hired Erin Coburn away from the J. Paul Getty Museum, lauding her as its “first chief officer of digital media” — a role created and promoted by the Met director and chief executive, Thomas P. Campbell, as part of his efforts to move the museum into the 21st century. Two years later, Ms. Coburn quietly left, along with a confidential settlement from the...
  • Mar 28, 2017Why John Leguizamo Writes Scripts For Himself

    John Leguizamo in  Latin History for Morons , which he also wrote.   Photo: Public Theater Like much of his work, John Leguizamo’s sixth play deals with a father-son relationship — only this time, he’s the dad. Leguizamo, 52, is himself the father of two, and it’s his son, Lucas, who becomes the focal point of  Latin History for Morons  — opening today at the Public Theater  —  when a classmate calls him a racial slur. The actor and playwright penned his theater debut — the one-man show  Mambo Mouth...
  • Mar 28, 2017The Philadelphia Orchestra Is Playing Pat Metheny This Weekend – And It’s Not A Pops Concert

    PHOTO: CLEM MURRAY - Chris Deviney, 51, principal percussionist with the Philadelphia Orchestra, practices in the percussion room at the Kimmel Center the concerto he created from three pieces by jazz guitarist Pat Metheny. Pat Metheny's  An Imaginary Day  is morphing into a not-so-imaginary percussion concerto -- to be performed this week by the Philadelphia Orchestra at its Thursday-through-Saturday concerts. The much-lauded jazz guitarist will not be on stage at the Kimmel Center.  Imaginary Day: Concerto for Vibraphone, Marimba, and Orchestra  is...
  • Mar 28, 2017Rodin’s Mistress Steps Out Of His Shadow With A Museum Of Her Own

    Camille Claudel working in her studio in 1887 More than 70 years after her death, the sculptor Camille Claudel—Auguste Rodin’s muse and mistress—has a museum of her own. The Musée Camille Claudel opened in her former family home in Nogent-sur-Seine, around 70 miles southeast of Paris, on 26 March.  Better known for her passionate, tragic relationship with Rodin and her 30-year confinement in a psychiatric hospital near Avignon, Claudel was largely forgotten as an artist until the late 1970s. The new museum holds most of the sculptures that she...
  • Mar 21, 2017A Look Inside Disney’s Massively Lucrative Remake Factory

    Photo-Illustration: Maya Robinson Back in 2007, Tim Burton made  a splashy homecoming . The director had spent the early part of his career working on short films for Disney and animating on now-forgotten projects like  The Fox and the Hound ; now he was returning to the studio to develop a pair of ambitious remakes, one of his short film  Frankenweenie  and the other a live-action remake of the animated  Alice in Wonderland . The reason that Disney had been so keen to lure the director back had mostly to do with product. In the years since...
  • Mar 21, 2017Robert Silvers, a Founding Editor of New York Review of Books, Dies at 87

    Robert B. Silvers in his office at The New York Review of Books in 2012.   Credit Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times Robert B. Silvers, a founder of The New York Review of Books, which under his editorship became one of the premier intellectual journals in the United States, a showcase for extended, thoughtful essays on literature and politics by eminent writers, died on Monday at his home in Manhattan. He was 87. Rea S. Hederman, the publisher of The Review, confirmed the death. The New York Review, founded in 1963, was born with a mission — to raise...
  • Mar 21, 2017Comic-Con Museum to Open in Balboa Park

    A 1930s baseball bat, 1950s tennis racquet and 1980s skateboard — all totems of San Diego’s rich sporting history — are being swapped out for comics, movie props and souvenirs of today’s pop culture in a major shift at Balboa Park. The San Diego Hall of Champions, a park institution since 1961, is going out of business and San Diego Comic-Con International is taking its place in a deal blessed by the city Wednesday and announced Thursday. The sports museum, a creation of the late Bob Breitbard, builder of the San Diego Sports Arena and inveterate...
  • Mar 15, 2017As Immigration Rules Tighten And Federal Funding For The Arts Disappears, What Happens To Classical Music In The US?

    The anti-immigrant phobias surging through Europe and North America have so far had little practical effect on classical music organizations, although there are notable exceptions — one of Britain’s most beloved orchestras, The European Union Baroque Orchestra, is presenting its last U.K. concert on May 19 and will then move to Antwerp.  The orchestras’ general manager, Emma Wilkinson, said recently, in the context of post-Brexit Europe: “I do worry that European orchestras will not be inviting talented British musicians to work with them. It will just...
  • Mar 15, 2017Misha Mengelberg, 81, Pioneering Pianist Of Europe’s Jazz Boom

    Misha Mengelberg performing in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, in 1996. Photograph: Frans Schellekens/Redferns In his last years the Dutch pianist, composer and improviser Misha Mengelberg, who has died aged 81, would sometimes whistle and sing in conversation with visiting friends when advancing Alzheimer’s disease made words particularly elusive. But conversing this way was perhaps not as big an inconvenience for Mengelberg as it might have been for some, since much of the music he had initiated and participated in for more than 50 years resembled a spontaneous conversation in...
  • Mar 15, 2017Dance Or Die: He Faced Down Death Threats From ISIS And His Father Rather Than Give Up Ballet

    Jean-Pierre Frohlich and Ekaterina Krysanova, a principal dancer for the Bolshoi Ballet. Credit Damir Yusupov for Bolshoi Theatre In 1951, “The Cage” shocked the world. Prickly and intense, this  Jerome Robbins  ballet concerns a female-dominated world where acts of violence are everyday occurrences. A Novice is born into an insect tribe, led by a Queen. Instinctively, the Novice knows what to do when a male intruder enters: She crushes his neck between her knees. She falls in love with a second intruder, but in the end, kills him, too. Her backup is a...
  • Mar 7, 2017For The Country Music Industry, The Subject Of Donald Trump Is Kryptonite

    The man’s face  is shrouded by shadows, but the silhouette is unmistakable: comb-over hairdo, thick neck, beefy red power tie. Two fists, bronzed and engorged like mylar balloons, pump skyward from a podium in a pugilistic dominance display. The reign of the 45th US president, as depicted in a  music video released late last month  by the outsider country artist Sturgill Simpson, is short-lived. It ends in an act of left-wing wish-fulfillment, with a boy in a cape destroying both the podium and a massive, barbed border wall, allowing a procession of...
  • Mar 7, 2017How The Hirshhorn Spent Two Years Preparing For The Yayoi Kusama Show

    The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden spent two years preparing to give visitors about 20 seconds of wow. “ Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors ” invites visitors to consider their place in the universe by immersing themselves in the Japanese artist’s whimsical and ethereal installations. The ephemeral nature of the exhibition’s mirror rooms — the enclosures that seem simultaneously cosmological and kitschy — belies the painstakingly detailed work required to host it. From constructing the conceptual artworks to controlling the...
  • Mar 7, 2017The Flapbooks Of 16th-Century Venice (They Were Oh-So- Naughty)

    Imagine you were a rich European in the 16th century, and you wanted to travel. Top on your bucket list might be Venice, a cosmopolitan, free-wheeling city, known for its diversity, romance, and relaxed mores. Venice was a wealthy place, where Titian, Tintoretto, and other famous artists were  at the height of their powers . As a republican port city, it was tolerant of all sorts of people and all sorts of behavior in ways that other European cities were not. While in Venice, you might purchase a flap book to help you remember the good times you had there. Above...
  • Feb 27, 2017The UK, Waterstones Opens ‘Unbranded’ Small Bookstores To Some Backlash

     The Waterstones store in Southwold is located in a grade II-listed building, and has a sign written in plain lettering above the front door. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo The managing director of book retailer  Waterstones  has defended the company’s decision to open three unbranded stores, saying it will be good for “customers, town centres and... staff.” Waterstones has recently opened three stores under different names, sparking accusations that they are posing as independent bookshops to avoid the backlash against the homogenisation of...
  • Feb 27, 2017A Shoving Match, Possibly Involving A Neo-Nazi, Broke Out At The Minneapolis Institute Of Art This Weekend

    Exterior view of the 24th Street entrance to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. A shoving match broke out in a most unlikely place, the typically serene Minneapolis Institute of Art, where three people who appeared to be neo-Nazis fought with several others in another group of activists, a witness said Sunday. Security guards arrived at the mayhem Saturday afternoon on the museum's third floor, broke up the confrontation and had one of the reputed neo-Nazis on the floor, said museum visitor Will Bildsten. A friend of Bildsten's said he saw punches thrown during the...
  • Feb 27, 2017There Was A Time When ‘Casablanca’ Was An Object Of Art-House Worship, But That Time Is (Finally?) Ending

    Photo illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo. Photo by Thinkstock. Still by Warner Bros. In 1957, the Brattle Theater on Harvard Square kicked off its Humphrey Bogart series with the 1942 classic  Casablanca.  Bogart himself had just died, and the response to the film was rapturous. By the fourth or fifth screening, “the audience began to chant the lines,” the theater’s then-manager told Noah Isenberg, author of  We ’ ll Always Have  Casablanca:  The Life, Legend and Afterlife of Hollywood ’ s Most Beloved Movie .  It...
  • Feb 22, 2017What Will DC’s Shakespeare Theatre Do Without Founder Michael Kahn?

    Michael Kahn, longtime artistic director of Shakespeare Theatre Company, will leave that position after the 2018-2019 season. (Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post) On any given night, in the houses that Michael Kahn built, you could find yourself transported to Illyria or Bohemia, to Dunsinane or Athens. Next to you might be seated a justice of the Supreme Court or an accountant from Gaithersburg or an English teacher from Manassas — all slaking their classical thirsts. Up on the stages of his Shakespeare Theatre Company, you were apt to encounter actors, nationally known...
  • Feb 22, 2017New Music Is Booming In L.A. – And There’s One Problem With That

    It was succinctly called “Noon to Midnight.” On Oct. 1, 2016, for 12 continuous hours, a succession of wide-ranging contemporary music concerts ebbed, flowed, and overlapped throughout Walt Disney Concert Hall: its auditorium, its lobbies, its stairways, its gardens, and eventually out onto the street. Presented by the Los Angeles Philharmonic, as part of its Green Umbrella series, this marathon of musical performances and multistage logistics attracted an enormous — and in many cases younger — audience. Many stayed for the entire 12 hours....
  • Feb 22, 2017Met Museum Director Makes The Case For The NEA In New York Times Op-Ed

    Thomas Colligan Four years ago, in a small warehouse in central  China , a team of Chinese archaeologists showed me objects that they had unearthed from a nearby ancient tomb. Laid out on a folding table was an exquisite array of vases, ritual vessels and a set of heart-stoppingly beautiful silver gilt tigers and dragons that fit in the palm of my hand, perhaps part of a long-forgotten regal board game. These finds were a keyhole through which we could glimpse the sophistication of the Han dynasty rulers, who, 2,000 years ago, conquered and united the enormous region that...
  • Feb 14, 2017New York City Ballet’s Sara Mearns Learns How To Play A Villainess

    Ms. Mearns donning makeup for her role as the Fairy Carabosse.   Credit Natalie Keyssar for The New York Times Fairies can be so fickle. One night, all you want to do is break a spell. The next, with ice in your veins and a malicious flourish, you put a curse into action. On Thursday,  Sara Mearns , the glamorous New York City Ballet principal, made an unlikely debut: the evil  Fairy Carabosse  in “ The Sleeping Beauty .” Her usual role, which she performed Wednesday, is the Lilac Fairy, Princess Aurora’s shimmering protector who...
  • Feb 14, 2017London Mayor Announces Plan For Massive Creative Hub In Thames Estuary

    How part of the development could look under the plans  Rory Gardiner The 40-mile stretch of water, from  Canary Wharf  to Southend in Essex and Thanet in Kent, is the subject of a  government development project to create tens of thousands of new jobs and homes by 2050.  Among the new proposals are  theatre-making studios in Bexley, an arts centre in Woolwich, a foundry for large sculptures and artworks in Silvertown including the UK’s biggest 3D  printing  centre, a gaming hub at the University of Essex, and industrial...
  • Feb 14, 2017America’s (And Maybe The World’s) Oldest Working Conductor

    Ed Simons, 100, the conductor and violinist, plays at his longtime home in Rockland County, N.Y. Credit Fred R. Conrad for The New York Times When strangers express amazement that he is 100 years old, the orchestra conductor Ed Simons likes to extend his longevity by saying his love for music “started before I was born,” spurred by his father playing Mozart symphonies on a Victrola. “I could hear the music in my mom’s belly,” said Mr. Simons, who lives in Pomona, N.Y., in Rockland County. “They told me when I was a kid that I would...
  • Feb 7, 2017After Three-Year Search, Vancouver Symphony Finds Its Next Music Director

    Otto Tausk, who will take over the music directorship of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in 2018, at the Orpheum Theatre on Thursday. Task has been music director of Switzerland’s Symphony Orchestra and Opera Theatre St. Gallen since 2012. The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra announced that Dutch conductor  Otto Tausk  will be its next music director, beginning July 1, 2018 — just in time for the orchestra’s centennial season. Tausk will take over the helm from  Bramwell Tovey , 63, who has served as VSO music director since...
  • Feb 7, 2017Small Liberal Arts College Gets $100 Million Worth Of Art For Its Museum

    Colby College's $15 million Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion, left, opened in 2013, making the Colby College Museum of Art the largest museum in Maine.  Staff file photo by Gordon Chibroski WATERVILLE — The Colby College Museum of Art has received a gift of more than $100 million from longtime supporters Peter and Paula Lunder that college officials say will help cement the region’s reputation as a world-class arts destination. The donation, the Lunders’ second gift of more than $100 million, includes about 1,500 works of art and will launch the Lunder...
  • Feb 7, 2017Developer Plans An Arts Center In An Old Renault Factory In The Middle Of The Seine

    Architectural rendering of the new S17 & S18 art hub proposed for the Île Seguin in Paris (© Baumschlager Eberle Architectes et RCR arquitectes) The property developer Emerige group plans to build an extensive art centre and 13,000 sq. m art hotel on Île Seguin, an island in the western suburbs of Paris that once housed the Renault car factory. The new development, called S17 & S18, will transform the former industrial site into “one of the biggest cultural hubs in Europe”, says a spokeswoman for the Emerige. The S17 centre will show...
  • Jan 31, 2017As Top-Tier Artists Age, the Art World Hopes to Cash In

    A Sotheby’s employee looking at Gerhard Richter’s “Blau” in London in 2014. Credit Andrew Cowie/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Chuck Close and other artists used to sit around bars like the Cedar Tavern and Max’s Kansas City and talk about art. “I have more conversations today over what we’re going to do to protect our spouses, our children, our work,” Mr. Close said. At 77, Mr. Close is among a critical mass of prominent — and profitable — artists in their twilight years (including Claes Oldenburg, 88;...
  • Jan 31, 2017The Arts-Are-Good-For-The-Economy Arguments Have Failed – They’ve Even Helped Kill The NEA, Argues Arts Exec

    (Credit: shutterstock/Getty/Mireia Triguero Roura) I spent more than a decade working for an organization that defended the National Endowment for the Arts. Every year, like clockwork, some Republican would magically balance the federal budget by gutting two agencies (the NEA and the National Endowment for the Humanities, or NEH) that account for one one-hundredth of one percent (.0001) of federal spending. For reference’s sake, our government spends roughly as much on paper clips and copy paper as it does on all of the nation’s theaters, museums and libraries...
  • Jan 31, 2017India’s Biggest Book Festival Warily Makes Room For The Hindu Radicals It Used To Conider Pariahs

    Writers, journalists and publishers at the Penguin Random House India party on the sidelines of the recent Jaipur Literature Festival.   Credit Poras Chaudhary for The New York Times JAIPUR, India — Every year at this time, India’s beau monde rearranges itself in Jaipur for a spectacularly popular five-day literary festival. There are Punjabi princesses in Jackie Onassis sunglasses, book club aunties in top-shelf homespun, parboiled-looking Englishmen, men of letters with Oxbridge accents and the occasional well-buffed South Delhi influence peddler. At...
  • Jan 23, 2017One Thing That’s Key To The Writing Life

    I began reading Louise Glück’s poems around the time I handed in the final draft of my first book. Now I can see that the book was a culmination of a decade of work and obsession, but at the time, without the manuscript to anchor my thoughts, I felt adrift. I had to come down from the high of achieving what I had set out to do and had to face the blank page again. For a year, I plunged into another project, until I realized that I was rewriting my first book and that I did not yet have the depth and experience to give the new story the justice it deserved. For another...
  • Jan 23, 2017All Of The Training That Goes Into Learning The Lion Dance For Lunar New Year

    Brandon Lee, 15, practiced with a lion head during a rehearsal for the Chinese Freemason Athletic Club dance troupe in Lower Manhattan.   Credit An Rong Xu for The New York Times The first thing you notice in the stairwell to the fourth-floor studio on Canal Street in Manhattan is the measured thumping coming from behind a metal door. Just beyond the entrance, large papier-mâché lion masks were twisting and turning to the drumbeat. On a recent Friday evening, the teenagers made their way across the studio floor — sagging from decades of jumps and...
  • Jan 23, 2017The Ultra Popular BroadwayCon Is In A Dispute With Actors’ Equity

    Theater fans at BroadwayCon in 2016.   Credit Caitlin Ochs for The New York Times Last January, the first BroadwayCon brought  thousands of theater fans  to New York despite a massive snowstorm. But one week before the convention’s  expanded second iteration , organizers have hit a snag: a labor dispute with the Actors’ Equity Association, who has asked its members not to perform, or even rehearse, for the event until an agreement is reached. In a note sent to Actors’ Equity members on Friday, Flora Stamatiades, the union’s...
  • Jan 17, 2017After 146 Years Ringling Brothers Circus To Fold Its Tents

    Feld Entertainment CEO Kenneth Feld (Tim Pannell for Forbes) Ringling Bros. circus announced Saturday that it would be closing down permanently in May 2017 after 146 years. Kenneth Feld, a billionaire whose family has owned the circus since 1967, blamed falling ticket sales after the retirement of Ringling Bros. iconic elephants following a bruising 14-year legal battle with animal rights activists. “Ringling Bros. ticket sales have been declining, but following the transition of the elephants off the road, we saw an even more dramatic drop,” Kenneth Feld...
  • Jan 17, 2017Dance Classes For The Blind At The Royal Ballet

    Increased confidence. Better range of motion. Improved balance. A sense of freedom. Most dancers, including those who are blind or partially sighted, would say that ballet training teaches all of these. Though dance is a highly visual art form, there’s no denying the kinesthetic reward of moving the body. That’s exactly why these students attend the Monday Moves classes, designed especially for people with visual impairment, in London. The participants range from young adults to senior citizens and have varying degrees of sight, but they...
  • Jan 17, 2017Hoard Of Gold Coins Found Inside Antique Broadwood Piano

    A gold hoard was found in a piano in Shropshire A mysterious hoard of gold coins has been discovered hidden in a piano in Shropshire and a local coroner now needs to determine whether it is “treasure”. The British Museum, which administers the Portable Antiquities Scheme, describes the find as “substantial”.  The gold was recently discovered by a tuner inside a Broadwood upright piano which had originally been sold in 1906 by a musical instruments shop in Saffron Walden, Essex. The ownership of the piano for most of the 20th century remains untraced,...
  • Jan 12, 2017Detroit Symphony Settles On New Contract Eight Months Early

    The positive tenor of relations between the  Detroit Symphony Orchestra  and its musicians continued as the musicians ratified a new contract more than eight months before the current contract expires. It's the second consecutive, three-year agreement negotiated well in advance of the expiration date, a notable accomplishment in the wake of the acrimonious 2010 contract negotiations that spurred the musicians' strike that year. The DSO and orchestra negotiating committee, representing 87 musicians, reached the tentative agreement for the new contract in...
  • Jan 12, 2017Pop Culture Has Become A Multi-room Echo Chamber With Little Broad Impact

    When “One Day at a Time” started its run on CBS in December 1975, it became an instant hit and remained so for almost a decade. In its first year, “One Day at a Time,” a sitcom about working-class families produced by the TV impresario Norman Lear, regularly attracted 17 million viewers every week, according to Nielsen. Mr. Lear’s other comedies were even bigger hits: One out of every three households with a television watched “All in the Family,” for instance. Last week, a new version of “One Day at a Time” started...
  • Jan 12, 2017What a Russian Dancer Really Thinks About Performing in the U.S.

    Growing up in Moscow, the American dance world was my American dream. I was a competitive ballroom-turned-jazz dancer, and I wanted nothing more than to perform jazz dance at its place of origin: the United States. But in Russia, we had certain stereotypes and misconceptions about the way the dance world works in the U.S. Since moving here and joining cast of the national tour of  Pippin , I’ve realized the reality of dancing here doesn’t always match up with my expectations.   Expectation : The American dance community is super competitive...
  • Dec 29, 2016I Taught Myself Piano In A Prison Cell, Using A Cardboard Box

    Every time I got a new cellmate, I warned him, “Don’t be alarmed. I have a cardboard piano that I play.” ILLUSTRATION BY ELEANOR TAYLOR In February, Jennifer Lackey, a philosophy professor at Northwestern University, where I teach journalism, invited me to speak to a class she teaches at the Stateville Correctional Center, a maximum-security prison an hour outside of Chicago. Her students, fifteen men, are all serving long sentences, mostly for violent crimes. Some will be at Stateville until they die. I talked with the students about storytelling, and had them...